rafafredd

Phase correction circuit. Cheap reverbs sound expensive...
« Reply #20 on: February 08, 2008, 06:24:58 PM »
Do not disturb the original one, as you have only one of this stuff. The way would be as it was said, to build one based on the patent schemati and compare if it works the same or not. Two quad opamps like the tl074 and a breadboard would do it in an afternoon. By the way, can you at least see what was the original opamps used in your unit?


barclaycon

Meyer module
« Reply #21 on: February 08, 2008, 08:18:37 PM »
Here's what I can tell you about the basic layout of the module.
It is a stereo unit.
Each channel consists of 4 x NE5532 op amps.
The first op amp is a differential input using 10k resistors with 120pF caps.
This then feeds the all-pass filter stage shown in tv's schematic.
The final op amp has a 100R resistor on the output for protection.

Any further detail will require destruction and dissection !
Hope that helps.

Martyn

tv

Phase correction circuit. Cheap reverbs sound expensive...
« Reply #22 on: February 09, 2008, 07:26:27 AM »
Hey, we got the schemo from the patent. Keep the reference unit intact :) cos' you'll need to validate the spinoff ...

I already figured (on my own, dammit!) that in a layout, there would be a "place left" for a differential input stage. I suppose that 120pf caps go between - and output and between + and ground of the first one in the first 5532? For the luxury, one could use the lm4562 ...

I'm still curious if this circuit would be useful for "euphonizing" material that's targeted for final 44k/48k playback but is recorded/mixed/processed @ 88k/96k.
If you sprinkle when you tinkle, please be neat and wipe the seat.

Rogy

Phase correction circuit. Cheap reverbs sound expensive...
« Reply #23 on: February 09, 2008, 07:48:09 AM »
Hi all,


Just wondering if this might work to improve the audible quality of FM transmitters (eg in-ear monitor transmitters); these all have a very steep 16KHz LPF built in to make sure no audio interferes with the pilot tone.

I'd love to try this circuit in this application.

Anyone an idea if the FM transmitters' LPF is "similar" to an A/D anti-alias filter?

Thanks,


Rogy

tv

Phase correction circuit. Cheap reverbs sound expensive...
« Reply #24 on: February 09, 2008, 09:40:59 AM »
Here's a quick-n-dirty layout, unverified. (first drawing, it needs a redraw for compacting). I think it should be correct to the patent schematic, but with added BALANCED OUTPUT rather than balanced inputs, so it could be connected before e.g. soundcard.



from left to right:

unbalanced input, first trimmer (panel-mounted), from bottom-top: second trimmer (also panel), balanced out, power supply +/- 15V
If you sprinkle when you tinkle, please be neat and wipe the seat.

LewKellogg

Phase correction circuit. Cheap reverbs sound expensive...
« Reply #25 on: March 14, 2008, 12:37:36 PM »
Has this gone any further? I can't seem to find the quick layout TV did but I'm interested if it moves forward.
Lew Kellogg
Kings Mill Audio

barclaycon

Phase correction circuit. Cheap reverbs sound expensive...
« Reply #26 on: March 14, 2008, 01:09:21 PM »
I think tv was going to knock up a prototype.
I'm a bit busy with a few other project at the moment.

rafafredd

Phase correction circuit. Cheap reverbs sound expensive...
« Reply #27 on: March 14, 2008, 06:38:54 PM »
I´m also interested in this one, but you would have to test the prototype against the original unit, to make sure it really works the same. If I could make it on veroboard and send it to you (with no PSUs), would you hook it up and test against the original maybe??

barclaycon

You're keen!
« Reply #28 on: March 14, 2008, 10:00:14 PM »
Well as you are so interested, then yes I would.

Martyn

tommypiper

Phase correction circuit. Cheap reverbs sound expensive...
« Reply #29 on: March 15, 2008, 03:52:21 PM »
I've been following the progress here.  I'd love to see it happen.  Count one more person who is interested!
Imagine a wet, slightly chilled from its gas release and decompression, with water droplets condensing, sucking surface tension, slowly sliding down the side, capped by a healthy virgin froth on top..


Moby

Re: Phase correction circuit. Cheap reverbs sound expensive...
« Reply #30 on: March 24, 2009, 10:11:08 PM »
Guys, what happened with this project? Did you tried the reverse engineered prototype?
For microphone transformers,  BV.8,  Bv.11,  Bv.12, etc.. contact me at mobyelectronics at gmail dot com

barclaycon

Re: Phase correction circuit. Cheap reverbs sound expensive...
« Reply #31 on: March 25, 2009, 09:36:24 AM »
I'm not too sure if anyone built a prototype as promised.
I haven't heard any more about this idea, so I assumed there wasn't much interest.

Moby

Re: Phase correction circuit. Cheap reverbs sound expensive...
« Reply #32 on: March 26, 2009, 07:14:32 AM »
I can't promise but I will probably try to make it. Cheers  ;D
For microphone transformers,  BV.8,  Bv.11,  Bv.12, etc.. contact me at mobyelectronics at gmail dot com


 

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