book suggestions after browsing the meta
« on: May 22, 2008, 10:12:52 AM »
I hope I'm posting this in the right place, if not, I can repost elsewhere.  I browsed the book meta and ordered a couple (art of electronics, troubleshooting analog).  I'm looking for a text that will cover amplifier design theory that will take me through the process starting with very simple CE amps building up into more complex circuits.  I'm taking "Analog II" at my local community college.  It has no official text book.  I'm looking something that will reinforce the material.  Right now we're working on a dc coupled CE amplifier and my notes aren't fine enough.
Any suggestions are greatly appreciated.
James


Ptownkid

book suggestions after browsing the meta
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2008, 05:53:54 PM »
The art of electronics will keep you occupied for a while.

lofi

book suggestions after browsing the meta
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2008, 06:39:55 PM »
and then a few weeks longer!!! its the book version of the Tardis
Are you professionally stupid, or just a gifted amateur.

Iain Westland (UK)


jdbakker

book suggestions after browsing the meta
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2008, 07:00:20 AM »
What they said.

For more insight in amplifier design, take a few known good amp schematics and try to analyze them using nothing but pencil, paper and the AoE chapters on transistors and low-noise hi-freq design. Learn to derive DC operating point and rough gain estimates with this technique. This may take a few passes per amp, but doing it this way will help you get an understanding of what happens.

For some areas, such as distortion, external information like http://www.dself.dsl.pipex.com/ampins/dipa/dipa.htm may come in handy.

JDB.

vertiges

book suggestions after browsing the meta
« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2008, 01:23:51 PM »
Quote from: "Ptownkid"
The art of electronics will keep you occupied for a while.


Yes... but there is no a lot of text bewteen the formulas !  :green:

I've just bought : Basic Electronic (US. NAVY) DOVER PUBLICATIONS, It's very very well written and very comprehensible.

eD
Quote from: "PRR"
> ...lighting tends to be lazy and typically finds a shorter path (such as my microwave oven).

jdbakker

book suggestions after browsing the meta
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2008, 01:32:28 PM »
Quote from: "vertiges"
Quote from: "Ptownkid"
The art of electronics will keep you occupied for a while.

Yes... but there is no a lot of text bewteen the formulas !  :green:

You must be talking about an entirely different The Art of Electronics than most of us have. One of the things I like about The Art of Electronics is that it is very light on formulas, with plenty of clear, helpful explanations instead.

JDB.
[maybe I'm misreading your smiley, but I felt it should be disambiguated lest it scares anyone away from AoE]

vertiges

book suggestions after browsing the meta
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2008, 01:49:01 PM »
Quote from: "jdbakker"
Quote from: "vertiges"
Quote from: "Ptownkid"
The art of electronics will keep you occupied for a while.

Yes... but there is no a lot of text bewteen the formulas !  :green:

You must be talking about an entirely different The Art of Electronics than most of us have. One of the things I like about The Art of Electronics is that it is very light on formulas, with plenty of clear, helpful explanations instead.

JDB.
[maybe I'm misreading your smiley, but I felt it should be disambiguated lest it scares anyone away from AoE]


I'm talking about the Horowitz / Hill version. It's definitely a bible and a must have, but it's not beginners oriented according to me.

I don't want to scare anyone...  :wink:

eD
Quote from: "PRR"
> ...lighting tends to be lazy and typically finds a shorter path (such as my microwave oven).

bcarso

book suggestions after browsing the meta
« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2008, 04:54:56 PM »
To James's original question, there is editor Shea's Amplifier Handbook from 1966.  Comprehensive, but obviously very dated.  At least it's readily available used and relatively cheap, and like H&H big enough to use as a middling doorstop if you don't like it.

keefaz

book suggestions after browsing the meta
« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2008, 06:17:21 PM »

Mbira

book suggestions after browsing the meta
« Reply #9 on: May 30, 2008, 01:44:19 PM »
Quote from: "vertiges"
Quote from: "jdbakker"
Quote from: "vertiges"
Quote from: "Ptownkid"
The art of electronics will keep you occupied for a while.

Yes... but there is no a lot of text bewteen the formulas !  :green:

You must be talking about an entirely different The Art of Electronics than most of us have. One of the things I like about The Art of Electronics is that it is very light on formulas, with plenty of clear, helpful explanations instead.

JDB.
[maybe I'm misreading your smiley, but I felt it should be disambiguated lest it scares anyone away from AoE]


I'm talking about the Horowitz / Hill version. It's definitely a bible and a must have, but it's not beginners oriented according to me.

I don't want to scare anyone...  :wink:

eD


Just start at the beginning.  I'm still in the first chapter after 2 years, but it's still the easiest book I have found!
Joel Laviolette

Rattletree   |  https://www.rattletree.com
The Rattletree School of Marimba | https://www.learnmarimba.com


 

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