CJ

Re: what, no beer talk in the brewery?
« Reply #40 on: September 15, 2009, 10:33:02 PM »
you almost have to have lemon with any good wheat beer...



and why 16 faces and not one BEER moticon?

« Last Edit: September 15, 2009, 10:43:00 PM by CJ »
If I can't fix it, I can fix it so nobody else can!
Frank's Tube Page: www.mif.pg.gda.pl/homepages/frank/vs.html
Guitar Amps: http://bmamps.com/Tech_sch.html


JohnRoberts

Re: what, no beer talk in the brewery?
« Reply #41 on: September 16, 2009, 10:30:52 AM »
Most of my visits to the land of wiese bier were during the winter for that messe in frankfurt...  So wiese with no lemon, and often I would drink alt (old) beer instead. The first and only time I drank and enjoyed a wiese bier with lemon was in hot'lanta.

JR
Don't only half-ass tune your drums. Visit https://circularscience.com to hear what properly "cleared" drums sound like.

Re: what, no beer talk in the brewery?
« Reply #42 on: September 16, 2009, 04:49:36 PM »
speaking of beer, happy birthday guinness 250 today! (and happy 100th birthday to the roundabout too)

deuc224

Re: what, no beer talk in the brewery?
« Reply #43 on: September 17, 2009, 03:50:19 AM »
CJ, you have got to be kidding me!!!!! Please please try a julius ecter hefe dunkel and see if it needs a lemon. When i was in germany, it was a great tasting beer without lemon. If you cant get one, i will gladly send you one. Seriously!  I love beer almost as much as i love my girlfriend ;D

JohnRoberts

Re: what, no beer talk in the brewery?
« Reply #44 on: September 17, 2009, 11:14:23 AM »
I've heard of Heffe wiese and dunkle wiese, is a heffe-dunkle some kind of blend?

JR
Don't only half-ass tune your drums. Visit https://circularscience.com to hear what properly "cleared" drums sound like.

shabtek

Re: what, no beer talk in the brewery?
« Reply #45 on: September 17, 2009, 11:28:10 AM »
hefe=yeast
weiss=wheat
dunkel=dark
Quote
is a heffe-dunkle some kind of blend?
is unfiltered, uses top fermenting yeast, has wheat in grain bill

I think darker color is achieved by
may use grains that have been kilned/roasted at higher temps,
may be boiled for longer periods to develop darkness/carmelize sugars in the wort
"really fine players do not use stomp boxes or master volume, they match the amp to the room and turn it up to 11.  Stevie Ray, BB King, Albert King, Duane Allman, Dicky Betts, Louis Armstrong"
   -CJ

JohnRoberts

Re: what, no beer talk in the brewery?
« Reply #46 on: September 17, 2009, 12:05:05 PM »
The darkness is caused by roasting the grains (barley) longer before grinding (like coffee) and boiling in the wort.

I guess they're all hefe wiese since they all use yeast. While the krystal weise has the yeast filtered out before bottling.

JR

Don't only half-ass tune your drums. Visit https://circularscience.com to hear what properly "cleared" drums sound like.

kato

Re: what, no beer talk in the brewery?
« Reply #47 on: September 18, 2009, 10:19:18 AM »

I just started a batch of newcastle style brown ale. The airlock is bubbling away in the studio.

Anyone know what happens when you boil your specialty grains?
The I noticed the instruction sheets said "DO NOT BOIL YOUR SPECIALTY GRAINS!"  just after the water came to a boil. I quickly turned the temperature down but they probably boiled for about a minute. Can't really start over at that point.

Mr. Snoid

Re: what, no beer talk in the brewery?
« Reply #48 on: September 18, 2009, 11:26:43 AM »
I used to get fresh Beck's dark on tap at a local pub... in a frozen mug too!  I haven't seen it in years, though.

I tend to try and support small local breweries, and Pennsylvania has quite a few nice ones... Yuengling, Straub, and a few restaurant/brew pubs that have sprung up.

The beer I made tasted like Harp lager, only yeastier. My old bulldog/Airedale mix used to love to slurp up the yeast left at the bottom of bottles.  But then again, she once ate 7 grams of crappy morrocon hashish my cousin left out on the coffee table. Aside from rivers of drool cascading down her chest and a slight stilted gate, she was none the worse for wear the next morning. Man, I miss that dog!

Tod
When the shepherd is weak, the wolf sh*ts wool.

JohnRoberts

Re: what, no beer talk in the brewery?
« Reply #49 on: September 18, 2009, 12:20:25 PM »

I just started a batch of newcastle style brown ale. The airlock is bubbling away in the studio.

Anyone know what happens when you boil your specialty grains?
The I noticed the instruction sheets said "DO NOT BOIL YOUR SPECIALTY GRAINS!"  just after the water came to a boil. I quickly turned the temperature down but they probably boiled for about a minute. Can't really start over at that point.

If you're talking about the adjuncts like roasted barley and dark malts, there can be a chemical change similar to leaving coffee on the heat too long, when it turns nasty.

I use a slightly different technique for dealing with this. I usually brew 5 gallon batches, so I boil one gallon of water separately from the rest of the wort. Remove it from the heat, and then stir in the pound or two of crushed roasted barley or dark malts.  I then cover and set aside to cool (so this brew is never boiled, similar to pour over coffee brewing).  Real serious coffee brewers actually warn about over extraction from leaving coffee grounds in the hot water too long but my experience is that it cools quickly enough. I suspect there may be further subtle differences from limiting the rest time, but for sanitation reasons prefer to keep it covered until the final steps. I guess I could force cool it similar to the wort, to stop extraction, but I don't.

I boil the rest of the wort with two typical (early and finishing) hop infusions.

After the wort has cooled sufficiently I first strain the 1 gallon of "brewed" adjuncts into the primary fermenter through a colander with a muslin boiling bag stretched across is. I pour some clear water into the grounds to get the last drops of brew, then discard. Then I strain the wort through this same muslin strainer to remove the hops from the trub. A little more water cleans the last of the wort from the hops. Then I top up the fermenter to 5 gallons and seal (I use two gallons of water in wort boil).

I actually pitch the yeast into the primary before I strain the roast adjuncts. I get a good fast start and less loose hops in the fermenter. I perceive a subtle difference between brewing separately and boiling the adjuncts in the wort using boiling bags. YMMV

Life is too short to drink inferior beverages.

JR

   
Don't only half-ass tune your drums. Visit https://circularscience.com to hear what properly "cleared" drums sound like.


shabtek

Re: what, no beer talk in the brewery?
« Reply #50 on: September 18, 2009, 05:39:06 PM »
boilng any grains is not advised...you should mash/ mini-mash grains, and boil in wort.
at least any recipe I've seen calls for that.

would not worry about it kato:will not be ruinous. the amount of grain and duration of elevated temps is miniscule especially considering ratio of grain to liquid
I've read boiling grains extracts tannins and will lead to undesirable flavors
when mashing all-grain you raise the temp of mash (grains) to near boiling to end the enzyme-starch conversion
then extract the sweet wort from the grains and boil.

a modified wort-boil volume is going to change hop utilization.
there are infinite variations that will lead to beer, so whatever works.
it is too easy to complicate the process

?--anybody let cooled wort settle out suspended material, then transfer to primary and pitch?
I've never done this for fear of contamination, and always have trub and cold-break matter in primary that I could do without

I made a counter-flow chiller for about $50 that works very nicely--use it with a pump rated for boiling wort (March Pump ?)
it cools 10g from boiling to cold tap water in about 8 minutes. cooling water to wort is about 3:1 so it is not real efficient there, but that water is used for clean-up/garden irrigation, etc.




"really fine players do not use stomp boxes or master volume, they match the amp to the room and turn it up to 11.  Stevie Ray, BB King, Albert King, Duane Allman, Dicky Betts, Louis Armstrong"
   -CJ

Skylar

Re: what, no beer talk in the brewery?
« Reply #51 on: September 30, 2009, 11:45:03 PM »
Just got back from the Great American Beer Festival in Denver, CO.

What a blast!
Many, many, many beers!
I enjoyed most every brew I tried (nearly 100) with a few exceptions.

My favorite = Deschutes "The Abyss" Imperial Stout.

Before the trip, I had a vision of myself getting very intimate with the old American Standard.
To my surprise, I survived and even felt great the following day (after an Advil + Pepto).

The event was held in downtown Denver at the Colorado Convention Center.






My friend Troy won the bronze in the European-Style Dunkel category.
Here he is pictured on the right (donning said medal) with my best friend Stephen who brews for Anheuser-Busch.




A good time had by all.


 

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