ppa

Re: High Current PSU question
« Reply #40 on: September 25, 2009, 02:36:51 PM »
yes, I'm going to offer the boards for sale.

Regarding API2520 , the original at 15V supply has a quiescent current of 15mA and 22mA at 20V supply.
But , several clones of it have different active components so at +-16V supply they are in range 16-25mA.
 
Regarding the APP2050 it have at 24V supply 25mA of quiescent current, but APP2050 isn't an exact clone of the 2520 but an improved version of it, infact, it run at 24V. The original API2520 (and all clones that I know) doesn't run at 24V.

  
« Last Edit: September 25, 2009, 02:39:57 PM by ppa »


ppa

Re: High Current PSU question
« Reply #41 on: September 25, 2009, 02:44:18 PM »

Have you used those rectifiers before? What are your thoughts on schottkys or fast recovery diodes? if you sell a board, would you consider putting pads for some other type of rectifier?



it's a good idea, yes I will do it

ppa

Re: High Current PSU question
« Reply #42 on: September 25, 2009, 03:41:03 PM »
For extra safety, I was thinking of rigging some sort of relay to cut off the high current DC when the cable is unplugged. I'm not sure exactly how, maybe an extra rail (Low V/low I) on an extra conductor going to ground with a series resistor? So that when you unplug the cable, you break the circuit and the relay cuts off the rest of the voltages.  BUT, I'm not sure how long a (almost) permanently running relay would last. And it's wasted energy, but this way no one will be able to stick a needle or something else small and conductive into the female XLR or whatever connector is on the back of the PSU case, and get the shock of their life.

I've got 48VDC but I'm here, however, I don't council to get 48VDC.   

jdbakker

Re: High Current PSU question
« Reply #43 on: September 25, 2009, 03:58:13 PM »
For extra safety, I was thinking of rigging some sort of relay to cut off the high current DC when the cable is unplugged. [...] this way no one will be able to stick a needle or something else small and conductive into the female XLR or whatever connector is on the back of the PSU case, and get the shock of their life.

People who would do this would already have been killed by sticking something conductive into a wall socket. Those holes are much easier to get into, and both the Volts and the Amps are much juicier if you go straight to the source.

As you point out, such a relay would be apt to make the contraption less safe and reliable, not more. By all means do make sure that all outgoing connectors are female, and that receiving equipment discharges any rail buffering caps fast enough not to be a shock hazard, though.

JD 'don't try to stand in Darwin's way' B.

Re: High Current PSU question
« Reply #44 on: September 25, 2009, 04:12:51 PM »
JD 'don't try to stand in Darwin's way' B.
LOL!! I have a daughter now.. I have to think of these things! but the more I think of it, the stupider it sounds.

where do you come up with all these "middle names"?

btw, I've personally had a lot more shocks since I started visiting this site....

ppa

Re: High Current PSU question New
« Reply #45 on: September 25, 2009, 05:34:20 PM »
I can not think that in a recording studio there is a baby that runs around it with a piece of wire to insert it into all XLR plugs. Sorry , but I think I would have a bit of difficult to sell a PSU made for a baby who runs around a recording studio  with a piece of wire to insert it into all XLR plugs.......... 

« Last Edit: September 25, 2009, 05:37:01 PM by ppa »


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
11 Replies
3108 Views
Last post May 10, 2007, 12:45:23 PM
by tarandfeathers
3 Replies
2964 Views
Last post May 13, 2008, 12:45:40 AM
by
0 Replies
1066 Views
Last post October 11, 2012, 03:18:15 PM
by skal1
18 Replies
1730 Views
Last post April 14, 2018, 03:35:21 PM
by JohnRoberts