SimonB

So I'm ready for final assembly on a dual EZ1290 unit I'm building and I realized that the sheet metal on the case is thinner than the other projects I've done. The problem is that I used to drill a hole through the bottom of the case and then use a larger drill bit to make the hole concave so that a flat head screw would be flush or just below the surface of the case so that I wouldn't worry about it scratching other gear in a rack. With this case the sheet metal is much thinner, I'm not sure what the exact thickness is but lets say it's probably the same thickness as a computer case. So how do I go about mounting the screws so that they don't stick out?

I was thinking about welding nuts into the inside of the case but that would be sort of time consuming. I noticed on most pro gear the case is indented on the bottom wherever there is a screw.

Any ideas? Maybe there is some obvious solution I'm missing here.


Ptownkid

adhesive backed standoffs?

Hairball Audio

Adhesive backed as suggested or use a plain aluminum stand-off and a blob of liquid nails.  It won't go anywhere.

IMO pro gear should always be on rails but that's another topic ;)
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mad.ax

If the metal is thin, this will be easy. I have used this method on 1mm thick chassis with success to mount a toroidal transformer.
I used the mounting kit of the toroid cause it was convenient, but for smaller holes you may as well use a flat head screw, washer, nut, and a socket of the appropriate diameter (taken out of a regular socket wrench kit)

Drill the hole. Insert the flat head screw from the outside. Position the socket on the screw on the other side (biggest hole against the chassis, smallest on top), add a washer, then the nut. Screw the nut. That will pull on the screw which will bend the metal. Done.

Hope this helps.

Axel
« Last Edit: February 26, 2011, 03:01:50 AM by mad.ax »

mad.ax

And this is the end result:

Axel

Ptownkid

Hah, nice!

kepeb

hey, that is nice :)
I was contemplating a noisy hammering and wood block dimple template for a case here.
cheers mad.ax :)
pyinag cosle aentttoin

Randyman...

IMO pro gear should always be on rails but that's another topic ;)

Lolz!  I was JUST praising your awesome 1176 cases and their PCB Rails in the D-LA2A thread :)  I certainly miss them on my D-LA2A as I'm troubleshooting a hard-wired (no terminal blocks) D-LA2A (3RU Tat case) - and removing the bottom is just not cool!!!  This same troubleshooting procedure was cake with your 1176's by comparison.  Not even mentioning the clean case exterior the rails allow.  I might have to retro-fit my D-LA2A with rails.

Do you sell the rails separately - or is it best to bend some appropriate metal strips myself?

Good stuff   8)
Randy V.
DIY just to get by

Hairball Audio

IMO pro gear should always be on rails but that's another topic ;)

Lolz!  I was JUST praising your awesome 1176 cases and their PCB Rails in the D-LA2A thread :)  I certainly miss them on my D-LA2A as I'm troubleshooting a hard-wired (no terminal blocks) D-LA2A (3RU Tat case) - and removing the bottom is just not cool!!!  This same troubleshooting procedure was cake with your 1176's by comparison.  Not even mentioning the clean case exterior the rails allow.  I might have to retro-fit my D-LA2A with rails.

Do you sell the rails separately - or is it best to bend some appropriate metal strips myself?

Good stuff   8)

Ask anyone who repairs gear for a living how they feel about PCBs attached to the bottom of the enclosure ;)

I sometimes have a few spare parts laying around, or just an enclosure (w/ rails) with no front panel.  The rails are adjustable. The problem with just providing rails is that cases can vary in size internally.  It may be easier to DIY if you have access to scrap and bending materials.  I bet you could find a way to DIY it cheap.

Mike
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SimonB

Good ideas guys. Any pictures of the rail mount method?


Hairball Audio

Good ideas guys. Any pictures of the rail mount method?

Checkout the last picture and the side shots.

http://hairballaudio.com/enclosure/


The board sits on 1/4" standoffs that are screwed to the bottom of the rail.
Hairball Audio, LLC
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ej_whyte

Stupid question here  :-\  but what difference does having it on rails make, you still need to unscrew it to do any work on it right?

Or i guess maybe its so you can just take the bottom panel off and get at it that way.


Hairball Audio


Or i guess maybe its so you can just take the bottom panel off and get at it that way.



Exactly.  You just remove the top and bottom panel, then you have access to the entire circuit and it's still secure and safely mounted.
Hairball Audio, LLC
DIY Parts and Kits
https://hairballaudio.com

Top secret stuff and upcoming releases:
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JamesW

I use "Rivnut" type products all the time. You can get them at Home depot, Princess Auto in Canada. http://aimfasteners.com/rivnut.html
Subject to change with out notice

Script

If the metal is thin, this will be easy. I have used this method on 1mm thick chassis with success to mount a toroidal transformer.
I used the mounting kit of the toroid cause it was convenient [...]

Just tried it on a Modu case (slim line) :) :)


 

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