mus1k_freak

Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #20 on: December 24, 2011, 03:06:18 PM »
vie been playing around with this kit http://ezscreenprint.com/ real easy to use no chemicals or anything you print the design on your computer and set it outside for about 60 seconds then rinse the screen with water and it cures. you can get started for about $60 and use the screen as many times as you want. Get the exposure times right is the hard part, but once you master that its real easy to make nice screens!


aladan

Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #21 on: December 24, 2011, 05:30:39 PM »

Quote
I did 1 minute as suggested and it was very bright outside, but the sun was behind some clouds at the time.


I havent tried sun exposure, but I think that it takes a lot longer that a minute.  Im sure that is what the problem is.

One tricky element is coming up with the "artwork" on full sized litho film to make the photo stencil.  Once Upon A Decade, there was a company here in OKC that had a huge litho camera, and thus could produce litho positives up to maybe 24" in height.


The 'EZ Screen Print' technique is a bit different to normal photo exposure screen printing processes, I think, and 1 minute is their recommendation for sun exposure. They have a clear video on their home page which shows the process in every step (for a shirt.)

Thanks for everyone's comments, I will see if I can find some enamel paint and try it out.

travis

Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #22 on: December 28, 2011, 03:17:20 AM »
I picked up enough screen today for eight 2U screens.  My plan is to put together a kit that includes screen,white ink, screen wash, emulsion, stencil remover and graphic squeegee.  I understand that this process is not for everyone, but I found it to be effective and I think that silk screening has a place in this community for sure.  It will be a while yet, but if you are interested stay tuned!
"some dive into the sea, some toil upon the stone"

gemini86

Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #23 on: December 28, 2011, 01:13:32 PM »
Def. Interested. Nothing compares to the look if screenprint.
- Rodney

"...you better call Kenny Loggins, 'cause you're in the danger zone."

Paultec

    Sherwood Forest, not so Great Britain
  • Posts: 75
Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #24 on: December 28, 2011, 09:04:18 PM »
The main problem i've encountered here is the cost of catalysed inks for printing on metal.

The last time I looked it was almost £100 for one litre of ink+catalyst.

I use Lazertran  http://www.lazertran.com/products/lazertran_products_original.htm

This decal does not require "Laquering over" as you bake it in the oven, then you remove the excess decal with isoproponol alcohol.

As the toner in laser printers is just powdered plastic, it bonds to any surface and will not come off...

Hope that helps.

Regards

Paul


Brian Roth

Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #25 on: December 29, 2011, 01:25:54 AM »
I picked up enough screen today for eight 2U screens.  My plan is to put together a kit that includes screen,white ink, screen wash, emulsion, stencil remover and graphic squeegee.  I understand that this process is not for everyone, but I found it to be effective and I think that silk screening has a place in this community for sure.  It will be a while yet, but if you are interested stay tuned!

Out of curiosity, which photo emulsion did you decide to use?  I have NO recollection of what I used to use 35 years ago.  I remember originally using a product which had a dark blue color, then switched to a product which was kinda "hot pink" at the suggestion of the local screen supply company.

Best,

Bri
Brian Roth Technical Services
Salina Kansas, home of the best vinyl on the planet!

http://www.BrianRoth.com
recordingservicesandsupply.com/
www.qualityrecordpressings.com/
store.acousticsounds.com

travis

Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #26 on: December 29, 2011, 05:30:13 PM »
Quote
Out of curiosity, which photo emulsion did you decide to use?

I actually just used a speedball product from the art supply store for my personal project and it worked just fine.  This is something that I am trying to decide right now though.  The photo emusion has a shelf life once you mix it.  This is kind of a problem for most people who might do a few projects in a year.  I did find an emulsion that is pre sensitized and has a much longer shelf life, but it costs a bit more.
"some dive into the sea, some toil upon the stone"

Brian Roth

Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #27 on: December 29, 2011, 09:12:57 PM »
I don't recall if the emulsions I used were pre-sensitized, or were ready to go...been too many decades!  <g>

I did learn one trick from the screen supply company when applying the emulsion to the screen., and that was to use a piece of plexiglas/acrylic as a "hard squeegee" on each side of the screen to make a thin, uniform coating.

Best,

Bri
Brian Roth Technical Services
Salina Kansas, home of the best vinyl on the planet!

http://www.BrianRoth.com
recordingservicesandsupply.com/
www.qualityrecordpressings.com/
store.acousticsounds.com

bieckmusic

Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #28 on: December 29, 2011, 10:05:00 PM »
Hi Paul,    :)

I saw your post about Lazertran.  Have you ever used the newer product they have which works with ink jet printers??  I tried to email them about it and they never got back with me.  My press and peel blue paper ruined the local copier's xerox machine so I'd rather use my own ink jet printer if possible.

just thought i'd check...

best,
greg

Paultec

    Sherwood Forest, not so Great Britain
  • Posts: 75
Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #29 on: December 29, 2011, 10:55:15 PM »
Hi Greg,

You can use an inkjet printer, but it kinda defeats the object as the panel will need lacquering afterwards.....Inkjet ink can't stick to surfaces like laser printer toner.

At the time I picked up an old HP Laserjet for £15 which did a perfectly good job. There's a list of compatible printers here: http://www.lazertran.com/products/lazertran_products_printers.htm

A tip for anyone using a colour laser printer for making screen printing film or Lazertran: When you print your image (which should be vector based artwork) onto transparency paper etc, print Cyan, Magenta and Black channels at the same time, this gives a deeper black... ;)

Regards

Paul


StefanW

Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #30 on: December 30, 2011, 09:12:35 PM »
That's some impressive front panel artwork - looks quite professional.

I've long wondered if it would be feasible to use hobbyist silkscreening to apply an etchant-resisting paint/ink directly onto copper clad. My main concern would be the screen/design stretching while applying the paint.

Has anyone here tried to make PCB's this way?

Happy New Year everyone!

Stefan

travis

Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #31 on: January 25, 2012, 08:41:01 PM »
I have been really busy lately but I thought that I would post a little update.  I have 8 bars assembled and I am still going ahead with it....just very slowly :)  stay tuned and I will post pictures when I am a little farther along! 
"some dive into the sea, some toil upon the stone"

gemini86

Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #32 on: January 25, 2012, 10:15:19 PM »
I work as a picture framer and have access to machines that could knock out bars super fast. Let me know if I can be of any help.
- Rodney

"...you better call Kenny Loggins, 'cause you're in the danger zone."

travis

Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #33 on: January 26, 2012, 02:51:43 AM »
Thanks Gemini,
I worked as a picture framer for 4 years as well and still have access to the shop.  It sure speeds things up!  Right now I am looking into the best way to stretch the screens.  For my personal project I stretched it like a canvas and it worked just fine.  I might try for a staple-less finish on these though.....   

"some dive into the sea, some toil upon the stone"

gemini86

Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #34 on: January 26, 2012, 12:57:27 PM »
Nice to meet a fellow framer. I've never personally stretched a silkscreen, what's the benefit to going staple-less? Is the material too stretchy? (I know that can be a problem.)
- Rodney

"...you better call Kenny Loggins, 'cause you're in the danger zone."

sr1200

Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #35 on: January 26, 2012, 01:34:12 PM »
I think the purpose is for uniform tension across the screen.  Staples will cause there to be relaxed points on the screen.  Think of it like a snare drum.  you could use 4 lugs to put a skin on, but for correct tension you need to have more.
MEI Studio - Long Island, NY: http://www.meirecords.com

gemini86

Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #36 on: January 26, 2012, 01:43:29 PM »
I think the purpose is for uniform tension across the screen.  Staples will cause there to be relaxed points on the screen.  Think of it like a snare drum.  you could use 4 lugs to put a skin on, but for correct tension you need to have more.

I've stretched plenty of artwork, including tie dyed silk, to know that can be a problem, but using a piece of double matboard around the outiside can solve that. It acts like a thick wooden drum hoop (to follow your drum tension theme)
- Rodney

"...you better call Kenny Loggins, 'cause you're in the danger zone."

sr1200

Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #37 on: January 26, 2012, 01:46:43 PM »
just thinking, mounting something (matting) and having to pour liquid on to it and then apply pressure to the screen....  im thinking that putting the matte board around it wouldnt help.. would probably absorb the paint or cause some kind of weird bleed on the edges.
MEI Studio - Long Island, NY: http://www.meirecords.com

travis

Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #38 on: January 26, 2012, 02:06:11 PM »
Quote
Nice to meet a fellow framer.
and in Oregon no less! 
It IS pretty stretchy, so you have to pull more gently than a canvas and stretch it as evenly as possible.

Quote
I think the purpose is for uniform tension across the screen.  Staples will cause there to be relaxed points on the screen.  Think of it like a snare drum.  you could use 4 lugs to put a skin on, but for correct tension you need to have more.

This is what Ive been brainstorming about.  I will say that It is not really an issue if you take care when stretching.  I like the matboard idea, but one thing you have to remember is that the screen will be exposed to water and chemicals.  I am working on a way to stretch it all in one pull and glue the screen to the bar.  If this doesnt work though I am not above staples ;D     

 
"some dive into the sea, some toil upon the stone"

gemini86

Re: Silk Screen Kit for DIY'ers
« Reply #39 on: January 26, 2012, 02:45:47 PM »
You might try that bar with s channel in the back, don't know what its called, just know that when I'm restretching an out of square piece, its on that bar.
- Rodney

"...you better call Kenny Loggins, 'cause you're in the danger zone."


 

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