joaquins

Re: Modular Digitally Controlled Analog Console Format
« Reply #20 on: September 12, 2013, 11:17:51 PM »
MIDI is a good choice but maybe limited by the 7 bit standard values, then you can add double precission but bandwith will be limited then for a big project... As control surface will work ok because you don't have all the controls running at one, you say this parameter this value... no more than a dozen of parameters at a time (I only have 10 fingers to move faders at once so maybe 10 parameters is enought) so double precision wouldn't harm... To send the parameters to the desk is other story, because everithing could be automated and there are a lot of parameters there... even if not all the automation is happening in at the same time when you stop and go back to start many of them may change and this could be a problem, I don't know the exact message capability of MIDI but I'd guess won't make a job with the speed we may want.

JS
If I don't know how it works, I prefer don't turn it on.


JAY X

Re: Modular Digitally Controlled Analog Console Format
« Reply #21 on: January 16, 2020, 11:23:38 AM »
Hi!

After each NAMM, it happens to me the same: I start dreaming on new gear... ideas.. etc...
But I want to  get back to the subject of the thread...given the market today.  It was 2013 ( I think) when SSL released the SIGMA summing mixer... a digitally controlled analog summing mixer....and Bettermaker has more digitally controlled gear....so....¡There is some ¿limited? interest!.... 8)....¿Right? ;D Also the modern chips today allow a certain "simplicity" or less complicated circuitry than early 2000's... Just some thoughts.

Jay x

JohnRoberts

Re: Modular Digitally Controlled Analog Console Format
« Reply #22 on: January 16, 2020, 11:35:58 AM »
My thoughts on this have not changed since 2013...

JR
Don't only half-ass tune your drums. Visit https://circularscience.com to hear what properly "cleared" drums sound like.

Andy Peters

Re: Modular Digitally Controlled Analog Console Format
« Reply #23 on: January 16, 2020, 12:04:31 PM »
Hi!

After each NAMM, it happens to me the same: I start dreaming on new gear... ideas.. etc...
But I want to  get back to the subject of the thread...given the market today.  It was 2013 ( I think) when SSL released the SIGMA summing mixer... a digitally controlled analog summing mixer....and Bettermaker has more digitally controlled gear....so....¡There is some ¿limited? interest!.... 8)....¿Right? ;D Also the modern chips today allow a certain "simplicity" or less complicated circuitry than early 2000's... Just some thoughts.

Jay x
Odd that this shows up after all these years.
A friend has an idea for a digitally-controlled compressor. The compressor design is unique; whether it's good, bad or indifferent is beside the point. But his idea is that it should be controlled by a DAW. DAWs store automation, and the automation can send MIDI messages to connected equipment. This way, you can insert this analog compressor into your project using DAC and ADC channels on your interface, and the project recalls the settings from the automation and then sets up the compressor.

To that end, I implemented USB-MIDI in a Silicon Labs EFM8UB2 micro. It appears as four MIDI ports to the computer, two in and two out. One in/out pair just implement USB-to-serial MIDI, so it'll talk to the standard DIN jacks.

The other pair of ports talk to the compressor control (MIDI OUT from host to device) stuff and status (MIDI IN to host). When you send the correct control-change messages, you can set the threshold, ratio, makeup gain. The messages are interpreted and it sets those hardware controls with digital pots or DACs or whatever. It will also set front panel indicators. On the status side, the design will have front-panel encoders and buttons, and when adjusted, the associated parameters are adjusted immediately and MIDI control messages are sent back to the computer. I think it'd be cool to also use the micro's ADC to monitor the gain-reduction voltage and then send that back to the DAW for display in the channel, although I haven't delved enough into how to configure a DAW to use it.

I ported the code to one of SiLabs' 32-bit ARMs, an EFM32GG, but I haven't tested it too much.

I am going to use this USB-MIDI interface block in a studio monitor controller design, replacing the RS-232 port I'm using now. (My friend also suggested adding Ethernet to the studio monitor design, so it can be controlled by a computer or even a smartphone app. I'm actually working on that now.)
"On the Internet, nobody can hear you mix a band"

JAY X

Re: Modular Digitally Controlled Analog Console Format
« Reply #24 on: January 16, 2020, 12:42:05 PM »
Hi!

Andy, as you have explained, I think also this is the way today: Some midi/daw control and perhaps a vst plugin/panel for the daw automation...So you can write/read automation sent to the hardware compressor...Today people want RECALL!! Ethernet also is interesting. SSL Sigma uses it for control volume/pan etc... from any internet browser, Explorer or Chrome.

Jay x


Andy Peters

Re: Modular Digitally Controlled Analog Console Format
« Reply #25 on: January 16, 2020, 12:55:01 PM »
Hi!

Andy, as you have explained, I think also this is the way today: Some midi/daw control and perhaps a vst plugin/panel for the daw automation...So you can write/read automation sent to the hardware compressor...Today people want RECALL!! Ethernet also is interesting. SSL Sigma uses it for control volume/pan etc... from any internet browser, Explorer or Chrome.

Jay x

Also, you asked, "Also the modern chips today allow a certain 'simplicity' or less complicated circuitry than early 2000's... Just some thoughts."

And that's completely true. The push to the "Internet Of Things*" has meant that all of the processor vendors (TI, ST, SiLabs, Microchip) make highly-intergrated microcontrollers with Ethernet and USB and other good stuff. Doing Ethernet and USB in an embedded design ten years ago was painful and expensive. Now it's a $5 chip with vendor-provided libraries, and free development tools.
"On the Internet, nobody can hear you mix a band"