abbey road d enfer

Re: Brexit
« Reply #1500 on: April 08, 2021, 12:22:58 PM »
it's been decades since I drank draught bier in Germany, but I seem to recall some specifications about how much head (foam) was on every serving. To avoid ever having to discard bier they engineered some extra turbulence into the taps, inadvertently making it all but impossible to fill a glass with one pull. As a consequence we would see half filled glasses sitting behind the bar waiting for the too frothy head to subside, so they could finish filling. When the bar got busy they would fill pitchers to reduce pour times.

   
JR

PS: This may have been a quirk of one small hotel bar outside Frankfurt.
I would think it's the case everywhere in Europe, except in the british(?) islands.
Here, foam is the reason why people want draft, not bottles.
Who's right or wrong is irrelevant. What matters is what's right or wrong.
Star ground is for electricians.


ruffrecords

Re: Brexit
« Reply #1501 on: April 08, 2021, 03:49:55 PM »

err...yes.

"Mr Shrimpton told Judge John Morgan, that Euro legislation allowed weights to be displayed in both metric and imperial, but the day would come when imperial would be outlawed."

- it was just his lawyer - and some years past - making a claim about something that might (but didn't) happen in the future.
And since it seems any move to compulsion (to drop alternative units alongside metric) was dropped in 2009 it seems bizarre to give that as a justification for voting to leave in 2016.
You may well be right. The thing is I am generally positive guy so,  although over the years there have been thousands of instances of unnecessary EU interference in Britain, I am not the sort of guy that writes them all down or commits dozens to memory just so that when someone says 'give me one good reason to leave the EU'  I have a list as long as your arm to quote.

Cheers

Ian
www.customtubeconsoles.com
https://mark3vtm.blogspot.co.uk/
www.eztubemixer.blogspot.co.uk


'The only people not making mistakes are the people doing nothing'

JohnRoberts

Re: Brexit
« Reply #1502 on: April 09, 2021, 09:00:22 AM »
I would think it's the case everywhere in Europe, except in the british(?) islands.
Here, foam is the reason why people want draft, not bottles.
I can't speak for what other people like about draft beer (probably price), but having a head of foam is generally evidence of pouring into a clean glass, and fresh well carbonated (not flat) beer. Flat beer has an undesirable, different mouth feel than fresh beer.

JR
Cancel the "cancel culture", do not participate in mob hatred.

Matt Nolan

Re: Brexit
« Reply #1503 on: April 09, 2021, 10:24:11 AM »
Us Brits are funny folk. We like our beer warm (well, room temperature or a shade below) and flat, and usually quite dark of colour. Even better if it has been hand pumped from a wooden barrel rather than pushed by gas pressurisation out of a metal keg.

Some of us do enjoy a lighter and more carbonated style which, in one pub I used to frequent, was affectionately referred to as "Eurofizz".

It's probably best that I don't recount the British Ale drinker's opinion of American beers ;-)

(really, I jest - your cutting edge micro-brews lead the world and, in places where it gets considerably hotter than here, there is a lot to be said for a colder and lighter concoction)

JohnRoberts

Re: Brexit
« Reply #1504 on: April 09, 2021, 11:06:40 AM »
Us Brits are funny folk.
Last century I sampled many pulls in local brit pubs... while traveling around the country with one of our local reps.
Quote

We like our beer warm (well, room temperature or a shade below) and flat,
Not exactly my experience. I saw more room temperature bier consumed in Germany back in 1970... I even kept my flip-top bier bottles stashed along the outside edge of our (army) tent and the September weather kept it pretty drinkable. Curiously the German bars catering to US soldiers chilled the bier and provided the locals with immersion heaters to warm up the bier.   
Quote
and usually quite dark of colour.
I am a fan of proper stouts and made sport of trying out new black and tan combinations in every new pub we visited. (I also found decent local stouts in Australia).
Quote
Even better if it has been hand pumped from a wooden barrel rather than pushed by gas pressurisation out of a metal keg.
As I recall it was "pulled", kind of lifted out with lever-scoop arrangement. The bar maid(?) pulled on the long handle-lever that rotated around a pivot point, raising a portion of fresh bier up that then the spilled out into a glass/mug as it tilted outward. 
Quote
Some of us do enjoy a lighter and more carbonated style which, in one pub I used to frequent, was affectionately referred to as "Eurofizz".
I am aware of any number of beer variants in the UK, bitter, lager, ale, pilsner (pils may not be brit, pilsner is a German thing). Then there'e session beers that aren't really a different type but lower alcohol version suitable for drinking over extended periods (sessions).
Quote
It's probably best that I don't recount the British Ale drinker's opinion of American beers ;-)
I recall the real ale drinkers holding lager "louts" in low regard.
Quote
(really, I jest - your cutting edge micro-brews lead the world and, in places where it gets considerably hotter than here, there is a lot to be said for a colder and lighter concoction)
Since I brew my own, I find most other beers inferior (because they are). My primary criticism of US microbrews are that they are generally over-hopped to impress inexperienced beer drinkers. Some don't suck like the mass market piss-water. 

JR

PS: The old joke about Brits drinking warm beer was because their refrigerators were designed by the same engineers who designed Lucas electrical systems used in the Brit sports cars. :-(
Cancel the "cancel culture", do not participate in mob hatred.

Re: Brexit
« Reply #1505 on: April 09, 2021, 12:42:48 PM »
Us Brits are funny folk. We like our beer warm (well, room temperature or a shade below) and flat, and usually quite dark of colour. Even better if it has been hand pumped from a wooden barrel rather than pushed by gas pressurisation out of a metal keg.

Haha, yep   :D
After 20+ years as a Brit living in the U.S.  I converted and crossed over the aisle.  I like my ale cold these days, which tends to limit the pubs I can drink ale in now that I'm back in the UK.   

The only pint I've been happy to drink at room temperature in recent times has been Guinness when in Dublin.
But I think of Guinness as being more of a meal than a pint so maybe that doesn't count?
 
D. J. H.

The standard way to reduce much of the noise and distortion in audio gear in 1955 was to have a couple of beers.
 Anything else was too fiddlesome and too expensive.

Matador

Re: Brexit
« Reply #1506 on: April 09, 2021, 04:07:30 PM »
Not exactly my experience. I saw more room temperature bier consumed in Germany back in 1970...
You'd get into some trouble saying that in Germany. :)  Last time I was living there it was patiently explained to me that most German beers (at least in Bavaria) are bottom-fermenting lagers, that were traditionally fermented underground where the temperature is pretty constant at about 50 degrees.  Hence the serving temperature would be close, between 50 and 55 degrees F:  pretty well split between American 'cold' (between 36 and 40 F) and British 'room' (65-70F).  Northern Germany might be different?

(pils may not be brit, pilsner is a German thing).
Now you are in trouble with the Czech Republic. ;)

Matt Nolan

Re: Brexit
« Reply #1507 on: April 09, 2021, 07:35:11 PM »
I recall the real ale drinkers holding lager "louts" in low regard. Since I brew my own, I find most other beers inferior (because they are). My primary criticism of US microbrews are that they are generally over-hopped to impress inexperienced beer drinkers.
1000% agree. It is actually hard to find a non-over-hopped example, but when you do, the good ones can be excellent.

I must confess, I was overplaying some stereotypes for comic effect in my post. You can get good beer and bad beer almost everywhere. I'm more interested in variety than I am in being a purist.

Quote from: JohnRoberts
PS: The old joke about Brits drinking warm beer was because their refrigerators were designed by the same engineers who designed Lucas electrical systems used in the Brit sports cars. :-(
;D

Cheers!

JohnRoberts

Re: Brexit
« Reply #1508 on: April 10, 2021, 03:16:34 PM »
You'd get into some trouble saying that in Germany. :)  Last time I was living there it was patiently explained to me that most German beers (at least in Bavaria) are bottom-fermenting lagers, that were traditionally fermented underground where the temperature is pretty constant at about 50 degrees.  Hence the serving temperature would be close, between 50 and 55 degrees F:  pretty well split between American 'cold' (between 36 and 40 F) and British 'room' (65-70F).  Northern Germany might be different?
Now you are in trouble with the Czech Republic. ;)

Indeed German beers are mostly lagers but reportedly the Weiss biers are top fermenting , and pilsners bottom fermenting. Doesn't matter to me I am not a fan of either.

Speaking of lagers and temperature while cold temperatures are recommended there is a variant lager called "steam beer" that is fermented at warmer temps. Reportedly during the California gold rush, miners lacked air conditioning but still wanted their beer. There is a modern brand (Anchor Steam) brewed using that warmer temp strategy (I am not a fan of anchor steam either, but they have an audience). 

JR

Cancel the "cancel culture", do not participate in mob hatred.