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Re: Restoring and old Neve desk
« Reply #80 on: January 09, 2017, 07:12:27 PM »
What?????

You used Black XLR's instead of the vintage Chrome ones?

Bad Job API!

 :P


API

Re: Restoring and old Neve desk
« Reply #81 on: January 10, 2017, 11:09:26 AM »
Ha!  ;D

For some reason i could not find these old style Neutriks in silver with gold contacts.
The plan is/was also to change them all to new ones since they are now close to 60 years old!

And yes, this deak was built way before phantompower became standard.
It would be quite easy to build it in and maybe mount a switch on the scribble strip by the faders, but i dont want to ruin the looks with a non-standard switch there.
I will leave that to the new owner of the console.

ruffrecords

Re: Restoring and old Neve desk
« Reply #82 on: January 10, 2017, 12:09:09 PM »
And yes, this desk was built way before phantom power became standard.

When I was there in the 70s there never were any phantom power switches. A desk could be fitted with phantom power which would be wired directly to all mic input XLRs. Phantom power was supplied by a single module that contained a simple switched mode power supply that that doubled up the 24V dc supply. Nobody worried about non-phantom powered mics being connected to mic inputs with phantom power.

I remember going to the first session at the Who's Ramport Studios with their new Neve console which I designed. They miced up the drums and monitored the result but it was terribly distorted. We discovered the phantom power supply module had failed. So me and their tech removed it and hooked up a bench supply to the the connector so Roger Daltry's first solo session could go ahead.

Cheers

Ian

nielsk

Re: Restoring and old Neve desk
« Reply #83 on: January 12, 2017, 04:23:41 PM »
A little late to note, but they used a color code on the buss bar pins, as I recall red is to a buss resistor and white is straight to / from the buss

API

Re: Restoring and old Neve desk
« Reply #84 on: January 12, 2017, 04:49:09 PM »
A little late to note, but they used a color code on the buss bar pins, as I recall red is to a buss resistor and white is straight to / from the buss

I think its the other way around, at least in this desk.
All the inputs via a resistor is via a white terminal and the outputs to the busses are via a red one straight from the bus wire.

Btw,  your transformers are on their way! Will send tracking tomorrow.

API

Re: Restoring and old Neve desk
« Reply #85 on: January 13, 2017, 04:44:46 PM »
When I was there in the 70s there never were any phantom power switches. A desk could be fitted with phantom power which would be wired directly to all mic input XLRs. Phantom power was supplied by a single module that contained a simple switched mode power supply that that doubled up the 24V dc supply. Nobody worried about non-phantom powered mics being connected to mic inputs with phantom power.

I remember going to the first session at the Who's Ramport Studios with their new Neve console which I designed. They miced up the drums and monitored the result but it was terribly distorted. We discovered the phantom power supply module had failed. So me and their tech removed it and hooked up a bench supply to the the connector so Roger Daltry's first solo session could go ahead.

Cheers

Ian

Wow, history lesson right there!
Must have been fun times Ian.

Can i ask you a technical question Ian?
In my desk there are three solid copper square bars.
One is for B+ and the other two are both for B- and in my 1883 (routing module) schematic it mentions signal B- and power B-.
Why where they separated in the frame?
They are connected underneath the centersection where there is alos a connection to the frame.
I guess it have to do with noise figures but do you know?

API

Re: Restoring and old Neve desk
« Reply #86 on: January 16, 2017, 05:16:25 PM »
Ok, time for another update!

This time i am attaching the new scribble strips with the fader numbering to the frame.
These are attached to the ISEP rails withouth any screws at the top, instead they use a kind of easy but ingenious system to be secured to the frame.
It requiers a little work, but looks oh so nice.
Hard to explain in words so i will let the pictures do the talking!


Here is the original scribble strip.
As you can see it has a piece of aluminium attached to the back of the plastic with one bolt at each end sticking out.
So after the plastic strip came back from the engraver i cut a piece of aluminium that was a few mm smaller than the plastic all around.




Then i cut the holes and countersink them so my bolt is flat with the surface.




I then secure the bolt with a nut and recheck so the head is still flat with the surface.




I then add my glue to the head side of the aluminium piece and join it with my plastic strip and clamp it down.




Voila!
Here we have the new scribble strip for channels 1-8.





Now i just add the smalle metal rectangles, drop it into place, twist the rectangles so they rest on the underside of the ISEP rail and secure the bolts.
This makes for a very tight connection and looks great from the front as well.



Alls set and ready to move on to the next 8 channels!




It is of course important to select the plastic and aluminium thickness so you get the correct thickneess when laminated.
This have to correspond with how low the ISEP rails sits in the frame where the strip is going, you do want it lay flush with the faders and aluminium surrounds.
Also on the longer part above the groupfaders i used three screws instead so there would not be any lift in the middle.