pucho812

looking for inexpensive tantalums
« on: October 12, 2017, 12:42:20 PM »
I have been trying to find inexpensive tantalums for the following values. closest I have been able to find is an alibaba link where it's a packet of ten for a few bucks but that seems too good to be true...

100uF/50V

10uF/63V

Every mic has a purpose it might be a door stop or a hammer, but every mic has a purpose.


Andy Peters

Re: looking for inexpensive tantalums
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2017, 01:56:56 PM »
I have been trying to find inexpensive tantalums for the following values. closest I have been able to find is an alibaba link where it's a packet of ten for a few bucks but that seems too good to be true...

100uF/50V

10uF/63V

through-hole or SMD? What case size?
"On the Internet, nobody can hear you mix a band"

pucho812

Re: looking for inexpensive tantalums
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2017, 05:46:47 PM »
through hole.  radial package although axial I could easily make fit.

MY point to asking was all I have seen so far is  around 50.00(USD) each  :o
Every mic has a purpose it might be a door stop or a hammer, but every mic has a purpose.

JohnRoberts

Re: looking for inexpensive tantalums
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2017, 06:13:33 PM »
For $50 I'd say check out low ESR aluminum electrolytics.

I only designed in tantalum once in my life, and that was in an obscure application, to match a tantalum used in the encode process. Tantalums have a specific dielectric absorption characteristic that could actually make a (very very small) difference in a side chain time constant circuit.

I am not sure what tantalum is good for these days, if ever (was low esr back when).

JR
John Roberts
http://circularscience.com
Tune it, or don't play it...

scott2000

Re: looking for inexpensive tantalums
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2017, 06:16:44 PM »
through hole.  radial package although axial I could easily make fit.

MY point to asking was all I have seen so far is  around 50.00(USD) each  :o

I have some 10/50v around here somewhere...(sprague 150d tantalex axials ???? and some kemet axials) ..I'll go by the surplus this coming Tuesday and check around for the values you're looking for......

but, as JR said, I've heard the newer low esr caps are better replacements these days.......???


pucho812

Re: looking for inexpensive tantalums
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2017, 07:31:42 PM »
Well the reason for wanting  the tants is operational temperatures exceed electrolytics. the tants can  run up to 125 degrees, which might solve an issue or two.
Every mic has a purpose it might be a door stop or a hammer, but every mic has a purpose.

scott2000

Re: looking for inexpensive tantalums
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2017, 07:53:02 PM »
Well the reason for wanting  the tants is operational temperatures exceed electrolytics. the tants can  run up to 125 degrees, which might solve an issue or two.

Makes sense....

I know I've seen/maybe have some axial electrolytics that vary their voltage rating at different temps.....or is it the other way around.......and they were rated @125.....but the properties probably aren't the same as tants and the tolerances probably as well....

I'll check when I'm shopping and grab what I can find..... Pretty common uf values that I wouldn't mind getting stuck with if you already get some by then......high voltages are pretty tough to come by.....


Edit------ I attached the data sheet for some electros I was talking about...... not sure of the properties you need but,these do rate @125 for certain voltages......
« Last Edit: October 12, 2017, 08:01:03 PM by scott2000 »

pucho812

Re: looking for inexpensive tantalums
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2017, 10:31:40 PM »
that is interesting for sure. 

Every mic has a purpose it might be a door stop or a hammer, but every mic has a purpose.

scott2000

Re: looking for inexpensive tantalums
« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2017, 05:58:00 PM »
that is interesting for sure.


So I found these today.....

Not sure of the ratings of the 4 M39003 (01-2179)  tants but they are 10uf.....I found 1 reference so far that says they are 75v


M39003/01-2179

CAP,TANTALUM / TA2O5,10UF,75VDC,+-20% TOL


The 2 Kemets are 15uf 75v

the two giant (almost 3")  are 100u 75v....both military JAN

Little time bombs???


LMK if you think you want  them....... ...I have no problem keeping them either...... They're actually pretty weighty.....

Also Just saw this Ebay sale for 10uf75v

http://www.ebay.com/itm/TANTALUM-AXIAL-M39003-01-2418-10UF-75V-CAPACITOR-LOT-OF-5-NNB-/361814233886?epid=13002073180&hash=item543dcf131e:g:npMAAOSwcUBYHMpn

and this

http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-2PCS-M39003-01-2418J-Hermetically-Sealed-Tantalum-Capacitors-10-75V-10-F-/252762638002?hash=item3ad9d3c6b2:g:hawAAOSwTuJYnGav


and some 100uf on ebay

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Capacitor-tantalum-K52-11V-63V-100uF-USSR-Lot-of-1-pcs-/141017294284?hash=item20d54925cc:g:OfEAAOxyPH9Ru703
« Last Edit: October 13, 2017, 08:55:52 PM by scott2000 »

pucho812

Re: looking for inexpensive tantalums
« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2017, 01:22:36 AM »
thanks dude.
Every mic has a purpose it might be a door stop or a hammer, but every mic has a purpose.


scott2000

Re: looking for inexpensive tantalums
« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2017, 02:14:53 AM »
thanks dude.

No prob! I was in the area and I like to stop by when I'm around there......
Got them all for $10.... they wanted $6.00 for 2 the big ones....
Prices are kinda steep sometimes but they have decent stuff ...
Well there here if you find you need them....
Just whistle


JohnRoberts

Re: looking for inexpensive tantalums
« Reply #11 on: October 14, 2017, 10:09:38 AM »
Old tantalums were notorious for failing spectacularly. I'd be nervous about buying outside of normal distribution.

For high temperature operation there are capacitors engineers for use in oil drilling instrumentation that can hack 200' or more.

JR
John Roberts
http://circularscience.com
Tune it, or don't play it...

scott2000

Re: looking for inexpensive tantalums
« Reply #12 on: October 14, 2017, 11:35:21 AM »
Old tantalums were notorious for failing spectacularly. I'd be nervous about buying outside of normal distribution.

For high temperature operation there are capacitors engineers for use in oil drilling instrumentation that can hack 200' or more.

JR

 :o.... I'll keep them for my home defense........

You better git....I'll put some high voltage to these.....

JohnRoberts

Re: looking for inexpensive tantalums
« Reply #13 on: October 14, 2017, 12:27:54 PM »
:o.... I'll keep them for my home defense........

You better git....I'll put some high voltage to these.....
I have blown up some capacitors over the years....(no tantalums tho).

Most spectacular was a big film cap back in the 60's used inside a switching power supply prototype to absorb switching overshoot spikes. Luckily I had walked away from my bench at the exact moment it decided to let loose... the foil particles looked like a snowstorm hit my bench.   :o

Low voltage polar aluminum electrolytics will make a loud report not unlike a rifle shot when plugged into a mains outlet (don't do that either).

JR 
John Roberts
http://circularscience.com
Tune it, or don't play it...

scott2000

Re: looking for inexpensive tantalums
« Reply #14 on: October 14, 2017, 02:47:41 PM »

Low voltage polar aluminum electrolytics will make a loud report not unlike a rifle shot when plugged into a mains outlet (don't do that either).

JR

  Hee HEE...... ok....



jensenmann

Re: looking for inexpensive tantalums
« Reply #15 on: October 15, 2017, 01:08:26 PM »

Low voltage polar aluminum electrolytics will make a loud report not unlike a rifle shot when plugged into a mains outlet (don't do that either).

JR

That´s what my students love to do when I´m out of the classroom. As a teach I´ll say  :P but in reality I think it´s  ;D
Jens
Quote from: PRR
The tubes of course don't care what frequency they distort