Mbira

Re: How do people do it? Buying a new console
« Reply #20 on: September 16, 2018, 01:44:58 AM »
who says they do.  A lot are financed from the bank or other Shylock.  Some get to pay it off just in time to buy another one.  In one case here in l.a. they took a loan out for millions using publishing to songs they had not written. they used the money to open a studio. it closed, their console was repossessed due to not making a payment on it,  and  they went to jail for bank  fraud.

I wonder what happened to the console...
Joel Laviolette

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pucho812

Re: How do people do it? Buying a new console
« Reply #21 on: September 16, 2018, 02:35:13 AM »
Like any bank repo,  the console was sold off to try and recoup money
You tell me whar a man gits his corn pone, en I'll tell you what his 'pinions is.

Re: How do people do it? Buying a new console
« Reply #22 on: September 19, 2018, 03:38:59 AM »
a lowly soundcraft 24 channel can be stunningly good for very little money - though of course you won't get automation etc - but there are alternatives to that ... like automating in your DAW and using your DAW in tandem with the console for submixing etc etc

abbey road d enfer

Re: How do people do it? Buying a new console
« Reply #23 on: September 19, 2018, 05:40:20 AM »
a lowly soundcraft 24 channel can be stunningly good for very little money - though of course you won't get automation etc - but there are alternatives to that ... like automating in your DAW and using your DAW in tandem with the console for submixing etc etc
Agreed, but the reason why about half the people buy a large mixer is for showing their clients how professional they are...
Who's right or wrong is irrelevant. What matters is what's right or wrong.
Star ground is for electricians.

Re: How do people do it? Buying a new console
« Reply #24 on: September 21, 2018, 03:05:42 AM »
Agreed, but the reason why about half the people buy a large mixer is for showing their clients how professional they are...

indeed! so keep the soundcraft in the back room and the nonfunctional Neve that you get for pennies on the dollar can sit in the 'show mixing room'

Whoops

Re: How do people do it? Buying a new console
« Reply #25 on: February 07, 2019, 07:12:54 PM »
Agreed, but the reason why about half the people buy a large mixer is for showing their clients how professional they are...

indeed, although thats changing a lot.
I can see a big change in the last 15 years on the client's perception of large format console related to being Pro or not

I can say that in the last 5 years most of the clients are not concerned any longer about seeing a large console or not.
But studio aestetics and confort still make a big difference of course, just without the big console in the picture

I used to work in a room with a big SSL 4K console in front of me, I liked it, but I don't need it or miss it.
The console is still in the same room/studio (although half of it broken) trying to get the client wow effect, even though it's not used to mix any longer
« Last Edit: February 07, 2019, 07:17:55 PM by Whoops »

pucho812

Re: How do people do it? Buying a new console
« Reply #26 on: February 12, 2019, 07:09:00 PM »
there are more affordable consoles that are new on the market but affordable is not a $$ tag so much as it is way less expensive then before.  I have seen some places that you just wonder how they can afford everything especially in places in San Francisco where you know everything is more expensive.

You can get a lot of console for little money these days.  If you do the Danial lanes approach,  you can really work something for little cash. He does the following: outboard and small mixers for input into his recorder of choice, Radar. From there he has a console that is purely for mixing duties. At his studio in Canada he has a Midas desk. At his studio in L.A. he sold off his old Neve and got a Trident 88(new console).  The trident is a great sounding desk as is the Midas. You can get a good Midas for little $$ and if you only mix with it, you are golden.   He does all his mixing by hand and sets things up so that he is down to 22 tracks using the last 2 tracks of his 24 I/O radar to be for the mix. Being digital can easily punch in when mixing by hand if a mistake is made or what have you.  I like the concept.

I just saw a calrec c2 desk on eBay. It has 40 mono channels and 8 stereo channels. with a asking price of 4K.  not bad at all considering the desk has lundhal mic transformers at every mic input. IIRC line transformers as well but been a while. They are well built desks that require little maintenance and being broadcast have a lot of redundant power supplies and such. I used to own one but sold it when I moved. I regret selling mine as my c2 I got for 500 dollars and it had 24 mono channels and 12 stereo channels.  good sounding desk with nice eq, it's not super flexible but it does have it in the right spots.  plus has a few VCA faders so you can group and mix by hand.
You tell me whar a man gits his corn pone, en I'll tell you what his 'pinions is.