s2udio

Pathetic misleading Garbbage
Could hardly even bring myself to read past the first sentence !

"Swapping cables can be a good exercise for developing your ability to listen"

So thats what I am doing wrong?!
As I said Garbage, more of a profile page for these idiots.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2019, 04:33:29 AM by s2udio »
On the end of a Rural Twisted Pair.

"The reason, he points out, is due to a difference in transmission speeds. "A cable that sounds strong in the low frequencies is simply slowing the high range a little bit so that it can transmit low frequencies quickly. "

 ;D

scott2000

that top comment....lol

"I use cheap cables from Amazon and daisy chain my power strip to get that lo-fi house sound "

pucho812

A well known mastering engineer had asked me if I make power cables because I do other wiring. I said sure and made 2 power cables.  They were made with 2 x different sets of wire from 2 different companies.  Both were 12awg cables.  In the end he was swearing up and down that one cable would be great for a sub and the other a preamp,  that he heard a big difference. Lol
You tell me whar a man gits his corn pone, en I'll tell you what his 'pinions is.

Seeker

I think everyone know that for an authentic vintage sound you should re wire your studio with knob and tube... 
Just watch out if you put any screws in the wall. :o
"Sometimes you have to play a long time to be able to play like yourself.” - Miles

Potato Cakes

"It was around the time that Monster Cable came out with cables that had strong, exciter-like characteristics, and I experimented connecting many different varieties to my amplifier."

"I think that cables definitely affect the sound. The more expensive cables tend to make this more obvious, and they can sound flashy. This can lead to a sense that you're hearing something that could not be heard before or that the cable has improved the sound resolution."

"I don't care so much about power these days, but in hindsight, my impression was that older power cables sounded harsh or sharp, more coloured and less honest. I didn't care so much for that, so I stopped using them."

Maybe they meant to say defective cables vs working cables. Maybe?

If only I could force myself to be less ethical I could clean up making speaker/power cables for the hifi world....

pucho812

cables do effect sound. quad cable vs standard 2 conductor and ground does sound different.   I will not argue which is better,  but I will argue that it is different and it is audible.

power cables effect sound too, if a power cable cannot handle the current then it will eventually fail and there is no sound as the unit will not turn on.
You tell me whar a man gits his corn pone, en I'll tell you what his 'pinions is.

boji

Quote
If only I could force myself to be less ethical I could clean up making speaker/power cables for the hifi world....

Let's coin a term for part of your cables' linecard:  Lo-Fionization.  808's become massive by slowing down higher frequencies.  ;D

JohnRoberts

Re: got corn ... or rice...?
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2019, 12:57:13 PM »
I didn't want to start a new thread about advertising BS, but this new ad campaign from Budweiser is amusing. Their big brag was that they don't use corn in their beer... The very old criticism of budweiser is that they use "rice" instead of more conventional beer malts (like barley).

Most major brewers, probably including Budweiser, use rice, corn, and other cheaper adjuncts to feed the yeast that turn sugars to alcohol. But Budweiser putting a spotlight on corn ignores the smoking gun in their own beer (rice).

FWIW I use a modest amount of corn sugar for priming (to feed the yeast after bottling to carbonate the bottled beer). So I am guilty of adding 100g of corn sugar to 6 gallons of bottled beer. I feel confident that my beer would spank budweiser in any taste test.

The other notable rice beer is from Kirin (Japanese) but the Japanese also make rice wines (sake).

JR 
Visit https://circularscience.com to hear what properly "cleared" drums sound like.


pucho812

from what I have been told, Budweiser switched over to rice during WWI or WWII as part of the war effort. I have not been able to confirm if that is true but  it seems plausible.  After the  war they stuck with it.  Again seems plausible.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2019, 04:16:28 PM by pucho812 »
You tell me whar a man gits his corn pone, en I'll tell you what his 'pinions is.

mjrippe

cables do effect sound. quad cable vs standard 2 conductor and ground does sound different.   I will not argue which is better,  but I will argue that it is different and it is audible.

power cables effect sound too, if a power cable cannot handle the current then it will eventually fail and there is no sound as the unit will not turn on.

I have heard a difference in ~25 foot mic cables, but never power cables.  If someone wants to believe that a zero gauge power cord from the wall to their amp will improve the 12 gauge wiring in their walls, so be it.

JohnRoberts

from what I have been told, Budweiser switched over to rice during WWII or WWII as part of the war effort. I have not been able to confirm if that is true but  it seems plausible.  After the  war they stuck with it.  Again seems plausible.
Reportedly they have used rice for a very long time but only fairly recently admitted to ingredients (printed on their label).

JR

PS: My apologies for triggering more magical thinking.
Visit https://circularscience.com to hear what properly "cleared" drums sound like.

PRR

I knew Bud used rice back when I was drinking, decades ago. I think it's been on the label a long-long time.

I don't see how it matters. Whatever starch Bud uses to feed its microbes, they must process-out everything except raw starch. I just got a box of starch "packing pellets". Are they corn? Rice? Potato? I don't think there's any DNA left. Probably work great for Bud.

"While beechwood chips are used in the maturation tank, there is little to no flavor contribution from the wood, mainly because they are boiled in sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) for seven hours for the very purpose of removing any flavor from the wood."

Gold

I have heard a difference in ~25 foot mic cables, but never power cables. 

I’ve heard a difference between shielded and unshielded power cables on a power amp.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2019, 03:44:24 AM by Gold »

JohnRoberts

I knew Bud used rice back when I was drinking, decades ago. I think it's been on the label a long-long time.
They have used rice a long time and indeed it was on the label.
Quote
I don't see how it matters. Whatever starch Bud uses to feed its microbes, they must process-out everything except raw starch.
The yeast process out (eat) all the "fermentable" dextrins (sugars), but yeast strains vary in how much they can extract and/or leave behind. The light beer category researched new beer yeast strains that could convert even more sugar to alcohol to reduce unproductive calories. Clearly any left over sugar affects flavor.

The source of that sugar makes a difference in byproducts and the un-fermentable dextrins left over, not to mention side products of fermentation.  These can be subtle, or not but I don't want to make hyperbolic claims about what I can taste (even if appropriate for this snake oil wire thread).  8) I have been brewing beer for decades and have a process that works for me, enough said.
Quote
I just got a box of starch "packing pellets". Are they corn? Rice? Potato? I don't think there's any DNA left. Probably work great for Bud.
Yes that is the irony... Mass market, mass produced beers are sharp pencil industrial processes tight about managing ingredient costs. I wouldn't be surprised if there was even some corn in their wort, but rice is not a very expensive beer ingredient.

I think I experimented with rice extract (rice prepped for fermentation) that is available from home brew suppliers. I only did that experiment one time. Didn't suck but wasn't better. I don't even have a specific recollection, good or bad.
Quote
"While beechwood chips are used in the maturation tank, there is little to no flavor contribution from the wood, mainly because they are boiled in sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) for seven hours for the very purpose of removing any flavor from the wood."
The dominant flavor additive in beer is finishing hops that add a bitter flavor note to offset the sweetness of unfermented dextrins left over from the malt. Hops are also preservatives which is why the recently popular old IPA (India Pale Ale) was so heavily hopped to survive long ocean voyages without refrigeration. The IPAs also had extra alcohol, which is also a preservative.

Mass market beer advertising (like anything else) is about creating differences where little or no difference exists, so caveat emptor.

JR
Visit https://circularscience.com to hear what properly "cleared" drums sound like.

American Bud ≠ beer  ;)



 

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