pucho812

You tell me whar a man gits his corn pone, en I'll tell you what his 'pinions is.


moamps

Re: DIY test equipment
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2019, 04:29:29 AM »
Interesting design, but IMHO the lorlin type rotary switches will not last long, especially in HT and heaters positions.
The initial heater current for some output tubes is way over the lorlins current rating.   

pucho812

Re: DIY test equipment
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2019, 01:43:13 PM »
true but still impressive one was built.  ;)
You tell me whar a man gits his corn pone, en I'll tell you what his 'pinions is.

ruffrecords

Re: DIY test equipment
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2019, 02:58:21 AM »
What surprises me is the guy can afford an A0 plotter yet he etched his own PCBs.

Cheers

Ian
www.customtubeconsoles.com
https://mark3vtm.blogspot.co.uk/
www.eztubemixer.blogspot.co.uk


'The only people not making mistakes are the people doing nothing'

iampoor1

Re: DIY test equipment
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2019, 10:32:56 AM »
What surprises me is the guy can afford an A0 plotter yet he etched his own PCBs.

Cheers

Ian

I think for the "craftsman" type like this, going PCBs from a fab would be heresy.  ;D

ruffrecords

Re: DIY test equipment
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2019, 02:34:42 PM »
I think for the "craftsman" type like this, going PCBs from a fab would be heresy.  ;D

But not drawing his schematics by hand isn't??

Cheers

Ian
www.customtubeconsoles.com
https://mark3vtm.blogspot.co.uk/
www.eztubemixer.blogspot.co.uk


'The only people not making mistakes are the people doing nothing'

Rob Flinn

Re: DIY test equipment
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2019, 04:36:10 AM »
What surprises me is the guy can afford an A0 plotter yet he etched his own PCBs.

Cheers

Ian

That's probably why he can afford an A0 plotter  ....
regards Rob

joaquins

Re: DIY test equipment
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2019, 11:11:09 PM »
I etch PCBs for projects where it probably many wouldn't... like industrial applications where PCB costs wouldn't be a problem, but for me delay times are usually way too long, and I can be mounting components on the etched PCB an hour after design is ready.

I'd run 3 prototypes in a night for small things when time is tight, good luck doing that with production PCBs, and for one offs, friendly PCBs like that project, no brainer.

JS
If I don't know how it works, I prefer don't turn it on.

benb

Re: DIY test equipment
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2019, 11:21:39 PM »
I see all the switches along the bottom for tube pinout configuration - was this based on an existing tube tester? That would make it easy to use the printed "database" of the original and all the tube types it gives.

If I were me I'd absolutely use a microcontroller and a bunch of relays and/or transistors and mosfets to do the same thing. You could "scroll through" a small display that shows each tube type, scrolling through by sorted type number, or by the most common types (12ax7) first. The whole database would be in program memory.

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
3 Replies
1585 Views
Last post November 27, 2004, 06:55:17 AM
by Ribbledox
14 Replies
3140 Views
Last post June 23, 2007, 03:05:30 PM
by tomelectro
37 Replies
9206 Views
Last post February 06, 2008, 09:40:51 PM
by JohnRoberts
14 Replies
3198 Views
Last post July 10, 2012, 01:55:07 AM
by leadbreath