abbey road d enfer

Re: Determining input impedance of audio circuit
« Reply #20 on: November 12, 2019, 11:15:41 AM »
I've experimented with both in one channel, and it's interesting.  The Neve circuit imparts its thing even after one amp, which is kind of a great thing that we can design and get the amount of poison we're after, whatever dose that may be.
Thing is, what is commonly called "warmth", "punch", "sizzle"... is actually the addition of harmonics and intermodulation products. Once they're added to the signal, there's no way to remove them, so adding IC's to a signal path cannot "sterilize" it.
Who's right or wrong is irrelevant. What matters is what's right or wrong.
Star ground is for electricians.


Re: Determining input impedance of audio circuit
« Reply #21 on: November 12, 2019, 12:56:38 PM »
Thing is, what is commonly called "warmth", "punch", "sizzle"... is actually the addition of harmonics and intermodulation products. Once they're added to the signal, there's no way to remove them, so adding IC's to a signal path cannot "sterilize" it.

Some would argue that a plug-in is a better way to add the warmth, sizzle, fo' shizzle-yo or what have ya after the fact.   I'm not so sure.   
Without getting into comparing digi models with analogue,  I think there's something to be said for going after a particular sound for your stems or tracks and commiting yourself to that tone.
Too much is left to the end these days in my very humble opinion, including flubbed or bum tuned or timed notes. 
Remember when you pushed up the faders on a track and the engineer and producer had been building the mix as things went along that, when it came time for it, it already sounded pretty close to a real record?   

Re: Determining input impedance of audio circuit
« Reply #22 on: November 12, 2019, 01:17:21 PM »
Thing is, what is commonly called "warmth", "punch", "sizzle"... is actually the addition of harmonics and intermodulation products. Once they're added to the signal, there's no way to remove them, so adding IC's to a signal path cannot "sterilize" it.

I have an all IC channel as well.  They have their own THD profile as well.   

Potato Cakes

Re: Determining input impedance of audio circuit
« Reply #23 on: November 14, 2019, 03:13:47 PM »
Just a quick follow up to the entirety of this thread, for a second revision of a prototype I'm working on, I am using 15k buss resistor networks and I am not getting the crosstalk levels I was getting on a previous version, meaning there is something not particularly correct with my first attempt. All the math checks out and everything is right as rain. There was much fixing and learning and de/resoldering on the first version, but I thought at least the bussing part was correct. Thanks again for everyone's input and help, even for something seemingly as rudimentary as buss resistor calculation. The issue I am experiencing is that each time I try to learn something past the color by numbers phase of DIY I feel that my brain swells trying to understand the math and where/how/why it applies. I appreciate the patience and the abundant giving of knowledge by everyone here.

Thanks!

Paul

ruffrecords

Re: Determining input impedance of audio circuit
« Reply #24 on: November 14, 2019, 04:32:21 PM »
One final tiny point. There is only one 's' in bus and only one in  buses also. You would be amazed how many supposedly pro manufacturers get this wrong so you are in good? company.

Cheers

Ian
www.customtubeconsoles.com
https://mark3vtm.blogspot.co.uk/
www.eztubemixer.blogspot.co.uk


'The only people not making mistakes are the people doing nothing'

Potato Cakes

Re: Determining input impedance of audio circuit
« Reply #25 on: November 14, 2019, 05:29:34 PM »
One final tiny point. There is only one 's' in bus and only one in  buses also. You would be amazed how many supposedly pro manufacturers get this wrong so you are in good? company.

Cheers

Ian

I thought that "buss" was used when referring to summing signal/electricity (i.e. buss bar). I do try to use english properly at all times despite those around me succumbing to emojis and texting grammar.

Fun fact: With a simple online search, it turns out "buss" is an archaic word used to mean "a kiss" or "to kiss," depending on it's usage in a sentence. Different fun fact: The correct spelling for an electrical summing network is "busbar." Now every here knows and is commanded to proceed accordingly...

Thanks!

Paul
« Last Edit: November 14, 2019, 06:13:01 PM by Potato Cakes »

abbey road d enfer

Re: Determining input impedance of audio circuit
« Reply #26 on: November 14, 2019, 05:36:06 PM »
Bus derives from Latin, "omnibus", which means "each", "for all".
So, indeed, it seems more correct to spell it with just one "s", but most of the damage is already done.  :D
« Last Edit: November 15, 2019, 04:14:31 AM by abbey road d enfer »
Who's right or wrong is irrelevant. What matters is what's right or wrong.
Star ground is for electricians.

JohnRoberts

Re: Determining input impedance of audio circuit
« Reply #27 on: November 14, 2019, 06:01:21 PM »
I thought that "buss" was used when referring to summing signal/electricity (i.e. buss bar). I do try to use english as proper as I know how at all times despite those around me succumbing to emojis and texting grammar.
"Buss" is a brand of fuses...(Bussmann).

"Buss" means to kiss...
Quote
Fun fact: With a simple online search, it turns out "buss" is an archaic word used to mean "a kiss" or "to kiss," depending on it's usage in a sentence. Different fun fact: The correct spelling for an electrical summing network is "busbar." Now every here knows and is commanded to proceed accordingly...

Thanks!

Paul
I have spent a few decades investigating and correcting this, and I spelled it wrong myself back in the early 80s (but that was almost 4 decades ago).  There is an old scottish derivation of buss that describes a vessel, close but still not a bus (omnibus).

JR
Don't only half-ass tune your drums. Visit https://circularscience.com to hear what properly "cleared" drums sound like.

PRR

Re: Determining input impedance of audio circuit
« Reply #28 on: November 16, 2019, 02:51:53 PM »
Bus derives from Latin, "omnibus", which means "each", "for all".

Apparently it comes to us through commercial French, with Latin inspiration and a pun.
« Last Edit: November 16, 2019, 02:56:35 PM by PRR »

Re: Determining input impedance of audio circuit
« Reply #29 on: November 16, 2019, 03:23:00 PM »


 

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