JohnRoberts

Re: Analog EQs
« Reply #40 on: May 16, 2020, 11:33:40 AM »
Abbey has been very generous with his knowledge and his extensive experience.

I do not perceive any of the slights attributed to him, but like beauty, affronts are in the eyes of the beholder, so I hope that beholder can get over it. I seriously doubt any was intended (but I still cannot read minds, sending or receiving). 

Complaining about free advice is rarely productive.

JR

PS: Yes I miss Brad (RIP) too, he was a tremendous resource for all of us. 
Don't only half-ass tune your drums. Visit https://circularscience.com to hear what properly "cleared" drums sound like.


Gold

Re: Analog EQs
« Reply #41 on: May 16, 2020, 12:32:52 PM »
He also has enough class not to ‘defend himself’.

john12ax7

Re: Analog EQs
« Reply #42 on: May 16, 2020, 10:04:11 PM »
This is one of the best places for audio related electronics discussion and knowledge,  in part due to Abbey,  along with others.  So I really don't understand the notion that he is not helpful.

abbey road d enfer

Re: Analog EQs
« Reply #43 on: May 17, 2020, 04:01:10 AM »
https://www.pro-tools-expert.com/production-expert-1/2018/12/20/using-the-warm-audio-wa273-eq-to-create-a-stereo-image-from-a-mono-signal-we-show-you-how

Have a listen and see what you think. I surprised UAD haven't questioned this as the software example sounds terrible in comparison with the hardware.
What a disappointment! The title wets your appetite, and it turns out to be a so-called "expert" showing you how to apply different EQ's and panning hard L&R. That was news in the 60's, at the advent of stereo records. There were dedicated boxes, "stereoizers" (Orban 245F Stereo Synthesizer).
You don't need to do that, because your L&R speakers do not sound the same for a start, and your L&R ears do not hear the same.
Once you've applied a touch of reverb on the track, the effect is lost.
Who's right or wrong is irrelevant. What matters is what's right or wrong.
Star ground is for electricians.

cpsmusic

Re: Analog EQs
« Reply #44 on: May 17, 2020, 04:08:35 AM »
What a disappointment! The title wets your appetite, and it turns out to be a so-called "expert" showing you how to apply different EQ's and panning hard L&R. That was news in the 60's, at the advent of stereo records. There were dedicated boxes, "stereoizers" (Orban 245F Stereo Synthesizer).
You don't need to do that, because your L&R speakers do not sound the same for a start, and your L&R ears do not hear the same.
Once you've applied a touch of reverb on the track, the effect is lost.

What do you think about the different EQs? Do you think the hardware sounds different or "better"?

abbey road d enfer

Re: Analog EQs
« Reply #45 on: May 17, 2020, 04:26:39 AM »
What do you think about the different EQs? Do you think the hardware sounds different or "better"?
I don't like the "hard-driven" take, but not to a point where I would be embarassed to use it in a mix. The other takes seem equally neutral to me. I don't perceive any additional dimension in the "stereoized" versions.
If it was my gig, I would have another take and pan the two tracks L&R; that's how you get dimension. IMO (as always).
And if I couldn't, I would add a tad of reverb, maybe some tempo-sync'ed delay. Well, I would do it anyway...  :D
Who's right or wrong is irrelevant. What matters is what's right or wrong.
Star ground is for electricians.


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
25 Replies
9847 Views
Last post February 14, 2014, 02:55:46 PM
by ravachol
4 Replies
3183 Views
Last post January 15, 2007, 02:25:09 PM
by lvg_stn
10 Replies
2827 Views
Last post February 14, 2007, 09:11:08 AM
by SSLtech
8 Replies
3971 Views
Last post July 02, 2015, 01:11:38 AM
by Youngwhisk