Whoops

Re: Nicerizer 8 restoration serial #00005
« Reply #20 on: July 14, 2020, 11:12:43 PM »
What do you get if you cross an NPN a PNP, 7 Resistor’s, 6 Caps a Diode and one of the original circuit boards which looks like it was carved out with a utility knife ! 😂 , Correct a fully refurbished and working DSOP2 DOA. My Nicerizer 8 serial 05 is fully functional again. The cost £2.60 a channel. That’s only because I replaced every part. That beats $50 each any day..

I'm really happy that you were able to discover that and fix it.
Can you please post photos of your findings and fix?
Thank you so much


Removing the encapsulating material on the first one was tedious and time consuming, I needed to know what was hidden inside, so I tried to preserve all the components as best I could.

After that it was a case of hit it with a heat gun and it all just pulls off in one go! 👍

Nice, great that you were able to take the epoxy out.

How did you removed it from the first one? what technics did you use?

Thank you


Re: Nicerizer 8 restoration serial #00005
« Reply #21 on: July 15, 2020, 11:03:55 AM »

Can you please post photos of your findings and fix?

How did you removed it from the first one? what technics did you use?


Hey whoops, how are you? hope your well...

Yes of course I can. Iv got one more channel left to do. This channel is already working and doesn’t really need doing, but over the weekend I’ll make a small video showing the process I used to  remove the potting material. I hope this helps someone down the road with a similar problem.

I won’t however show exactly what the components used are, nor the circuit it’s self I’m afraid.  The reason for this is someone here on GroupDIY has already been threatened by Phoenix Audio if they divulge the inner workings of the DOA. See...  https://groupdiy.com/index.php?topic=56469.0

I’m not sure if Phoenix Audio could do anything, but I’m not going to take that risk. Also I guess  the designer Dave Rees must have spent much time and effort designing the circuit, and in respect to him I don’t think it would be fair to let everyone in the world have his design when he never intended it.... hope you all understand.

However I will show how exactly how you can do it for yourselfs, to this or any other circuit covered in the same encapsulating material..... As the old saying goes teach a man to fish.... bla bla bla....
« Last Edit: July 15, 2020, 11:28:07 AM by LostFocus »

Whoops

Re: Nicerizer 8 restoration serial #00005
« Reply #22 on: July 15, 2020, 10:34:05 PM »
Hey whoops, how are you? hope your well...

I'm fine mate, how about you?


Yes of course I can. Iv got one more channel left to do. This channel is already working and doesn’t really need doing, but over the weekend I’ll make a small video showing the process I used to  remove the potting material. I hope this helps someone down the road with a similar problem.

Thank you so much, thats great. It will really help a lot of people fixing gear in the future.

I won’t however show exactly what the components used are, nor the circuit it’s self I’m afraid.  The reason for this is someone here on GroupDIY has already been threatened by Phoenix Audio if they divulge the inner workings of the DOA.

You could do that with no problems, you would just be helping people that have Nicerizer units in fixing them.
All UK made Nicerizer units failed or are failing. (company changed hands and are based in the US now)

Phoenix Audio US are not even using the same circuit for the Opamps nowadays.
If the Opamp is patented the schematic is available.
If not, of course you can reverse engineer it and publish it for repair.

Keep in mind that the Phoenix Nicerizer is a Boutique , Class A, very expensive product that was designed with Opamps that get very hot , encapsulated in material that does not dissipate well the heat and burns them.  It happens in all the units
Not very nice

I'm personally not interested in the circuit, I had already my share of problems with those units in the past, I'm just saying there's not problems in sharing the circuit and that can help other people out in the future.


However I will show how exactly how you can do it for yourselfs, to this or any other circuit covered in the same encapsulating material..... As the old saying goes teach a man to fish.... bla bla bla....

That's really nice and helpful.
Thanks

Re: Nicerizer 8 restoration serial #00005
« Reply #23 on: July 16, 2020, 12:05:34 PM »
Thank you so much, thats great. It will really help a lot of people fixing gear in the future.

 As I said earlier, Iv been lurking in the background for a few years and think the sense of community sprit on here is fantastic. I’m Just glad I can contribute in some small way😁.


Just moving the subject forward a little, I’m actually now considering reverse engineering the input stage of the unit, in an attempt to copy the whole signal path of a channel,  this would allow me to make as many channels as I wanted and build a really big sum bus.... can I ask about transformers and some input off you guys in the know? ... has anyone got any idea how I’d choose an appropriate one?  Or to work out the specifications of the ones that are already fitted?
 

Thanks

moamps

Re: Nicerizer 8 restoration serial #00005
« Reply #24 on: July 16, 2020, 03:24:45 PM »
.... can I ask about transformers and some input off you guys in the know? ... has anyone got any idea how I’d choose an appropriate one?  Or to work out the specifications of the ones that are already fitted?
Nice progress, congratulations!
If you have one preamp that works, it is relatively easy to find all the critical parameters of the output transformer.
The following information is required:
- mechanical dimensions of the transformer,
- DC current through the primary,
- transformer voltage ratio (AC voltage ratio primary to secondary),
- primary and secondary coil resistance and
- primary inductance.
Of course, it would be easiest to send a transformer to CJ for deep and detailed analysis.  :)
Block schematic (network around DOAs) would also be helpful.

Whoops

Re: Nicerizer 8 restoration serial #00005
« Reply #25 on: July 19, 2020, 09:43:37 AM »
By analyzing the original transformers, ratio , materials , etc and by analyzing the electronic circuit it would be easy to find a suitable transformer, probably easier to get something already available from a good brand that meets the circuit specs (cinemag, carnhill, sowter, Jensen, lundhall)


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
8 Replies
2642 Views
Last post August 31, 2004, 08:25:39 AM
by Jazzy_Pidjay
7 Replies
4270 Views
Last post January 04, 2005, 07:11:09 AM
by mcs
2 Replies
1404 Views
Last post October 08, 2006, 03:14:27 PM
by SUPERMAGOO
7 Replies
3555 Views
Last post July 24, 2009, 01:16:04 PM
by 1954U1