boji

Media bias- a graphical representation
« on: July 26, 2020, 04:11:04 AM »


 ;D  Actually think there's a little something to this...Just as it is not the image above that is moving as you read this, but our brains that create the sense it is, so does information we feed on daily create a sense of reality that measures correctly but is not always so.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2020, 06:41:53 PM by boji »


Re: How newsfeed algos create worldview- a graphical representation
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2020, 06:02:42 AM »
Interesting optical illusion , the thing I found about it is it only gives the impression of movement when your eyes are moving relative to the image ,move the screen and keep your eyes still  ,you dont get the impression of movement , weird .

scott2000

Re: How newsfeed algos create worldview- a graphical representation
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2020, 08:56:02 AM »
That's pretty great.

JohnRoberts

Re: How newsfeed algos create worldview- a graphical representation
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2020, 09:55:02 AM »
Not sure what that image has to do with topic...  (BTW nothing appears to be moving on my monitor.)
====
Algorithms are written by humans so no surprise that they contain bias.

JR 
Don't only half-ass tune your drums. Visit https://circularscience.com to hear what properly "cleared" drums sound like.

boji

Re: Media bias- a graphical representation
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2020, 01:57:55 PM »
Quote
Not sure what that image has to do with topic

Brains concoct (perform, in this case, visual alchemy); don't just strengthen/weaken synapses, but meta strengthen/weaken. 

Shame you can't see the movement. Visual cortex is doing what I imagine language centers do about circumstances, things; we fill in the gaps and so reality as we think it, is partially illusory.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2020, 06:08:18 PM by boji »

boji

Re: Media bias- a graphical representation
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2020, 02:01:01 PM »
Quote
it only gives the impression of movement when your eyes are moving relative to the image ,move the screen and keep your eyes still  ,you dont get the impression of movement , weird .

True!  Has something to do with periphery / threat discovery I'd bet.

JohnRoberts

Re: Media bias- a graphical representation
« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2020, 02:34:15 PM »
Brains concoct (perform, in this case, visual alchemy); don't just strengthen/weaken synapses, but meta strengthen/weaken. 

Shame you can't see the movement. Visual cortex is doing what I imagine language centers do about circumstances, things; we fill in the gaps and so reality as we think it is partially illusory.
Yes I am familiar with how brain filters and "rationalizes" input data to fit templates of preconceived expectations. This rationalization process is how most successful studio efx work with a little delay here and there. 

I recently moved my old 55" TV monitor over to my computer desk (sweet). I tried making the session window smaller but that didn't reveal any perceptual movement. Maybe I'm just old...  ;D

JR

Note: Peripheral vision is much more sensitive to low level light (something about difference between rods and cones?).  Next time you are outdoors looking up at the night sky try glancing off axis and dimmer stars may be visible. This was a trick they taught us in the army to see better in the dark, a useful skill in some situations.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2020, 03:51:57 PM by JohnRoberts »
Don't only half-ass tune your drums. Visit https://circularscience.com to hear what properly "cleared" drums sound like.

scott2000

Re: Media bias- a graphical representation
« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2020, 02:41:41 PM »
Weird...I have to focus to get it to stop....almost a cool meditation exercise....... But yeah that TT trick works too.....

my wife couldn't see any movement.....

boji

Re: Media bias- a graphical representation
« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2020, 02:54:11 PM »
Quote
didn't reveal any perceptual movement.

my wife couldn't see any movement.....

Absolutely fascinating!  The more I scan peripherally, the more it moves.

Edit: ok ok, so then the feedback loop of the 'imagined, threatful other' is augmented to tend towards safety / reduce risk.

Quote
brain filters and "rationalizes" input data

All very well, but I'm not rationalizing the movement, per se, looks like real movement in no need of rationalization but for the fact it is actually not moving.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2020, 03:14:43 PM by boji »

JohnRoberts

Re: Media bias- a graphical representation
« Reply #9 on: July 26, 2020, 03:59:57 PM »
Absolutely fascinating!  The more I scan peripherally, the more it moves.

Edit: ok ok, so then the feedback loop of the 'imagined, threatful other' is augmented to tend towards safety / reduce risk.

All very well, but I'm not rationalizing the movement, per se, looks like real movement in no need of rationalization but for the fact it is actually not moving.
The classic perceptual distortions (like Escher's) involve structures or shapes that can be interpreted two ways (or more)  depending upon how you frame or reference it.

There is some discussion about this in a chapter about judgement (Kahneman "Fast and Slow thinking") with a few examples. Often perspective is involved because this is one of the things the brain has to manage when converting raw data into an acceptable reality (like the way the perceived size of the moon changes when up in the middle of the sky, or down near the horizon) .

JR
Don't only half-ass tune your drums. Visit https://circularscience.com to hear what properly "cleared" drums sound like.


boji

Re: Media bias- a graphical representation
« Reply #10 on: July 26, 2020, 06:11:45 PM »
Quote
There is some discussion about this in a chapter about judgement (Kahneman "Fast and Slow thinking") with a few examples.

Kahneman and Tversky are brilliant, and you've given me another reason to finish their book, so thanks!

Re: Media bias- a graphical representation
« Reply #11 on: July 26, 2020, 06:52:33 PM »
Doesnt the atmosphere act like a gigantic lens ?
Moon looks big as it rises above horizon ,when its mid sky it doesnt get the visual amplification so looks smaller , size/mass of the moon hasnt changed,  only our perception . I like Boji's original point  , is social media warping our perspective of normality?

JohnRoberts

Re: Media bias- a graphical representation
« Reply #12 on: July 26, 2020, 07:56:31 PM »
Doesnt the atmosphere act like a gigantic lens ?
not in this case... If anything near sunrise or sunset the light passes through more of the atmosphere which shift the color temperature of light toward red.
Quote

Moon looks big as it rises above horizon ,when its mid sky it doesnt get the visual amplification so looks smaller , size/mass of the moon hasnt changed,  only our perception .
https://www.timeanddate.com/astronomy/moon/horizon.html

The human brain when estimating the size of distant objects looks for known objects near it to compare that size to... When the moon is near the horizon, we know it is still very far away, but it is near things like trees and buildings, or mountains that we know are huge. Therefore the moon must be even larger than objects it is compared to.

When the moon is up in the middle of the sky there is nothing nearby appropriate to compare it to. We default to the relative fraction of the total sky it occupies (not much), so it is perceived as not very large. 
Quote
I like Boji's original point  , is social media warping our perspective of normality?
All media influences our perspective... ads are probably even worse because they are actively trying to. Search engines are full of advertising so indeed trying to change our view of reality (we need to buy that new "xyz" to be cool or whatever). Since social media is full of advertising (paid promotion, so yes social media warps public perception.

JR
Don't only half-ass tune your drums. Visit https://circularscience.com to hear what properly "cleared" drums sound like.

boji

Re: Media bias- a graphical representation New
« Reply #13 on: July 27, 2020, 01:43:20 PM »
https://www.ted.com/talks/lisa_feldman_barrett_you_aren_t_at_the_mercy_of_your_emotions_your_brain_creates_them?language=en

Ok so we're all stuck with predictive pumps, verified by media that ALSO seeks to predict what we want, so to create max interaction time. The loop funnels attention with algos that create experiential confirmation so encompassing, we bind our sense of who we are to it.  Yuck.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2020, 02:22:23 PM by boji »


 

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