buildafriend

PCB Wash
« on: July 13, 2016, 02:35:42 PM »
Hi,

What methods do you consider best for cleaning flux off of PCBs? There are some very expensive looking commercial wash's but are they necessary for DIY? There must be something consumer grade that works better than just a small tank of 99% isopropyl alcohol.. is that all you use if anything at all? I'm curious to hear about how you PCB people go about this.

Thanks regardless,
-JP


john12ax7

Re: PCB Wash
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2016, 03:14:10 PM »
I've switched to just using no clean solder.

But if you need to clean then its pretty hard to beat isopropyl and some good swabs.

Andy Peters

Re: PCB Wash
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2016, 03:36:52 PM »
Hi,

What methods do you consider best for cleaning flux off of PCBs? There are some very expensive looking commercial wash's but are they necessary for DIY? There must be something consumer grade that works better than just a small tank of 99% isopropyl alcohol.. is that all you use if anything at all? I'm curious to hear about how you PCB people go about this.

I'm with John12ax7 on the no-clean solder.

At work, we use a low-foaming no-phosphate cleaner called Detergent 8. A gallon costs about $100, but you dilute it something like 50:1 (one gallon makes 50 gallons of usable solution). Squirt it on the board, scrub with a toothbrush or a 1"-wide chip (paint) brush with the bristles cut short, and then rinse with de-ionized or distilled water. (Tap water leaves that white powdery residue.) Works better than alcohol, too. Dry the board with compressed shop air.

NB: ensure that your parts can be washed! Don't try to clean a board that has un-sealed pots or switches installed.
"On the Internet, nobody can hear you mix a band"

JohnRoberts

Re: PCB Wash
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2016, 07:41:43 PM »


I'm with John12ax7 on the no-clean solder.

At work, we use a low-foaming no-phosphate cleaner called Detergent 8. A gallon costs about $100, but you dilute it something like 50:1 (one gallon makes 50 gallons of usable solution). Squirt it on the board, scrub with a toothbrush or a 1"-wide chip (paint) brush with the bristles cut short, and then rinse with de-ionized or distilled water. (Tap water leaves that white powdery residue.) Works better than alcohol, too. Dry the board with compressed shop air.

NB: ensure that your parts can be washed! Don't try to clean a board that has un-sealed pots or switches installed.
I would like to repeat, make sure the parts can tolerate the cleaning process. 

Back in the  80s I had a business partner who liked to dry off PCBs with a high pressure air hose.  Unfortunately he blew water inside some of my polystyrene caps that I used back then (polystyrene caps are kind of wimpy).

JR
« Last Edit: July 15, 2016, 10:56:40 AM by JohnRoberts »
John Roberts
http://circularscience.com
Tune it, or don't play it...

ppa

Re: PCB Wash
« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2016, 07:18:29 AM »
what does it mean "kind of wimply" ? I did not found this word " wimply" on dictionary

EDIT: I guess it should be "wimpy"
« Last Edit: July 14, 2016, 07:22:28 AM by ppa »

JohnRoberts

Re: PCB Wash
« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2016, 11:02:55 AM »
what does it mean "kind of wimply" ? I did not found this word " wimply" on dictionary

EDIT: I guess it should be "wimpy"
Yes I meant to write wimpy.... (fixed it)


picture of the original "wimpy".

Polystyrene caps have a really nice dielectric and electrical performance, but cannot tolerate high temperature, and high pressure water/air cleaning.

JR
John Roberts
http://circularscience.com
Tune it, or don't play it...

walter

Re: PCB Wash
« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2016, 07:49:17 PM »
I like to use Flux Off when I want a really clean board, but I clean that off with Alcohol. 
Blown like a fuse

buildafriend

Re: PCB Wash
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2016, 08:14:47 PM »
Detergent 8 is ion free and is used to clean nuclear reactors as well as PCBs. 100 bucks for 50 gallons really is not that bad if you think about it.. but you would need a lot of boards to clean. It would be nice if they sold it in smaller amounts than 1 gallon of concentrate.

https://www.alconox.com/Resources/StandardDocuments/TB/techbull_detergent8.pdf


Whoops

Re: PCB Wash
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2017, 09:13:42 PM »

gar381

Re: PCB Wash
« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2017, 07:17:43 PM »
Has anyone tried Cybersolv C141R ??

GARY

RETIRED.....  from 51yrs in Show Biz

gar2520, gar1731 and gar918 DOAs at  http://capi-gear.com/catalog/index.php?cPath=71_72
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Re: PCB Wash
« Reply #10 on: February 10, 2017, 08:03:25 AM »
I use this :
http://www.kontaktspray.hu/en/?Products:Cleaners_and_contact_maintainers:Kontakt_PCC_printed_circuit_board_cleaner

you achieve the same results with a toothbrush and iso- Alcohol

Second that: isopropyl with a toothbrush to clear all the gunge, and then finish off with a soft broad paintbrush. Make sure you have plenty of ventilation

Mike

joaquins

Re: PCB Wash
« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2017, 12:11:16 PM »
  I self etch most of my boards, usually when I need them I need one or two right now... 1 month is typical wait here.

  I make the board, right after brush with flux to protect in the meanwhile, components and solder, isopropyl, coat with insulating spray, ready to get the rust and moisture of every day industrial abuse  ;D

JS
If I don't know how it works, I prefer don't turn it on.