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tommia

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Sorry to hack this threat, but I don't want to start a new one for a simple question:
Who can help me with the footprint of a jfet to92? Something I will need for a distortion compressor I' m desiging.
 
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Sorry to hack this threat, but I don't want to start a new one for a simple question:
Who can help me with the footprint of a jfet to92? Something I will need for a distortion compressor I' m desiging.
TO-92 is a standard package size and is definitively already in the Kicad standard footprint library.
 

tommia

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Yes you would think so but there is even no section with transistors in the footprint section. Only powertransistormodules or so .
 

Bobby Baird

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Find footprints and symbols here.
Are in mouser or digikey they have links to symbol and footprints on the part pages.
 

ccaudle

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no section with transistors in the footprint section

A 2N7000 symbol in the transistors_FET schematic symbols has TO-92-Inline as the footprint.
Looking at the symbol details that footprint is in Package_TO_SOT_THT library. There is a series of TO-92 footprints for inline, staggered, leads bent with body on PCB, etc.
 

tommia

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@ ccaudle: great! I try to remember the word "package" in the future. Lots of options there.


We don't have to invent the warm water. For more special items I will look at the mouser pages.

Is there also a footprint for capacitors with multiple sizes? Lets say in one spot you will give the option to use 7,5mm or 5mm electrolytics later?
 
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ccaudle

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Is there also a footprint for capacitors with multiple sizes?

The usual way to handle that (in other programs I have used) is to put two capacitors in the schematic, connected in parallel, with different footprints. In the layout put the footprints one on top of the other so that only one can be installed. If you use automated bill of material processing you will probably need an attribute in the schematic symbols indicating which should be installed and which should not be installed.
I do not know if KiCAD may have a way to indicate a dual footprint, but the old way of just including two parts and manually placing them in the same location seems easy enough.
 

tommia

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@ ccaudle: You 're full of great ideas! So simple and so good, why didn't I came up with this approach.
 

tommia

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I designed a mono compressor, is there an easy way to copy the pcb layout to make it stereo?
 

MidnightArrakis

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I designed a mono compressor, is there an easy way to copy the pcb layout to make it stereo?
[Is there also a footprint for capacitors with multiple sizes?] -- In the early days of CAD PCB-design, I worked at an "RF" company that designed custom equipment for "covert" U.S. Government agencies. Due to the nature of the "RF" circuits, some of the capacitors that -- could -- be used in certain sections of the circuitry could be any "one" of "four" different sizes!!! Instead of using the technique that Ccaudle has suggested (which is a perfectly fine way of doing things), I used to create custom PCB-footprints that had 5 pins.....1 as a "Common" and the other 4 spaced-out as necessary for each of the different sizes. The schematic would then only show a single capacitor symbol and it would only have a single PCB-footprint. Then, the schematic would have a "NOTES" Reference Number next to the symbol which would provide the necessary information as to which value and type of capacitor would need to be used for each different situation.

[is there an easy way to copy the pcb layout to make it stereo?] -- It would depend upon -- HOW -- you want a "stereo" unit to be. 1) You can either have two separate channel electronics within a single enclosure and each channel has its own set of controls, switches and knobs, or 2) You can use two separate channels of electronics, but instead use "Dual" control pots and switches, so there is only one set of pots, switches and knobs, or 3) You can use a single set of pots, switches and knobs to control both channels of electronics, providing that there is some manner in which to have a "Stereo-Link" connection or control voltage between the two channels.

From there.....you would then need to modify the schematic accordingly and then update the schematic "Annotations" (i.e., all of the Reference Designators) and output a new set of GERBER and N/C Drill data files. Your call.....

I once created a "Stereo" ALLISON Research "Gain-Brain" Compressor/Limiter in a 1U rack-chassis back in 1977 by mounting two separate PCB's into the chassis and tying them together using a provided "Stereo Link" pin on each PCB controlled by a switch. Once the two separate PCB's were connected together using the "Stereo Link" connection, the "Left-Channel" pots controlled both channels together, just like as my DBX166XL operates.

Personally.....I would decide and select on one of the above methodologies and create a single PCB that has both channels on it. But, that's just me.....

/
 

tommia

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The unit will have 8 separate compressors (for convenance I said stereo) all the linking is there on the mono pcb on the left and right side of the pcb . The idea was to design one channel and than copy paste the other channels.
Unfortunately this doesn't work as planned. As it took me 2 days to design I don't want to redo the work several times.
The gain brain is a great compressor. I have always at least one in use.
 

ccaudle

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The idea was to design one channel and than copy paste the other channels.

PCB's are usually manufactured on 18"x24" panels, then cut apart after manufacture. If you work with your board supplier you might be able to get groups of 8 channels arranged in a way that they can be used without cutting apart.
 

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