Where to study analog block circuitry online?

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Goblin

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Oct 17, 2018
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I suggest you to focus on a topic, and read that in TAOE and Sedra/Smith and so on, go back and forth, for example (...)

Hey, really appreciate your response Dualflip. Written in stone, that's how I'm gonna start. I pulled out my notes from Basic EE and Circuit Analysis, went through them and I remember most of it, so I'm having them at hand and I'll just go over it if I don't recall something, if I see that I may have to go over those two Courses I'll just take 2 weeks on those.

For the time being I'm doing everything in SIMS, not building yet, there is a shortage of everything where I live. When I'll begin building I'll start with Fuzz Boxes, Tremolo Boxes and everything under the sun, graduate with a Roger Mayer Uni-vibe, and move on up from there.

Again, I really appreciate the time you guys take helping me with my task at hand.
 

benb

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Jan 3, 2012
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Great suggestions so far. You might like the Youtube channel of Georgia Tech prof. Aaron Lanterman. A lot of it is about his music synthesizer circuitry course, but he's got "ordinary" analog teaching videos as well, in addition to his other courses:

For a lot of practical basics you want all of Forrest Mimms' little books from Radio Shack back in the day,"Engineers Mini Notebook" series, probably the best thing to come out of Radio Shack:

Walter Jung published some good books. "IC Op-Amp Cookbook" and ""Audio Ic Op-Amp Applications."

Once you get through TAOE (3rd edition), you may want to pick up "The X Chapters," extras that didn't fit in the book and that's been advertised since the 3rd came out (what, five years ago), but only finally came out about a year ago. These are (IMHO) outrageous analog projects, and the website has quite a few sample chapters:
 

Goblin

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Oct 17, 2018
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Great suggestions so far. You might like the Youtube channel of Georgia Tech prof. Aaron Lanterman. (...)
Thanks so much Benb. Will check out the Radio Shack books for sure. The YouTube channel looks very interesting and attention grabbing. Lots of equations of blocks explained in real time. So good. I'm into synths and basically everything that makes or changes sound so that channel is for sure going to give me more ideas and help me out. Thanks for the other resources, which are of critical help.

I've seen mentioned the Op-Amps books from Walter Jung so deff going to grab a hold on those.

Thanks again and I'll keep taking all recommendations as they help me immensely.
 

Goblin

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Oct 17, 2018
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Oh, I forgot, I've been studying how to make my own mics, but I'll tackle that in it's entirely further down the road. They're really not that hard, but I guess for the time being I'll just buy kits or brand ones.
 

Dualflip

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Oh, I forgot, I've been studying how to make my own mics, but I'll tackle that in it's entirely further down the road. They're really not that hard, but I guess for the time being I'll just buy kits or brand ones.
A word of advice, Its cool that you have a very broad interest, but remember the phrase "Jack of all trades, master of none"
 

Goblin

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Oct 17, 2018
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A word of advice, Its cool that you have a very broad interest (...)

Yes, you're right. I see it everyday in the Music Eng., Producing, and in the band giggin' world.

When I started to brush up on my knowledge about Basic EE and Basic Circuit Analysis the second time, around 2019, with intentions on building my own clones, I came across the same Axiom. Jack of all, master of none. The first time I studied Basic EE was in Sae Institute back in 2005.

While I was checking out everything concerned about building clones, I came up with a plan so to don't fall into that pitfall. Study four or so model schematics of a not-crowded recording chain, until I have it down, and then move on to different models.

One schematic of each: Pre-Amp, Compressor, Stomp Box, Amp.
I already know kinda by memory the ins and outs of a classic fuzz box, with a little brush up I can open up LTspice and input the schematics, and I'm pinning down the Fender Champ F51. I can solder different resistors in guitar cables and color code them with no problems. I know a few tricks here and there. The Big Muff it's a world on it's own but some years ago I replaced my reading list for schematics and stuff about building clones, including theory. And the usual Philosophy books here and there.

Until I know what usually goes wrong with them, how and where they usually break down, how to analyze and search for problems in that specific model, how to calibrate and service them, every x amount of time, I won't move to the next model. I kinda know what I'm getting into lol and I love it.

I don't plan on designing my own, but cloning them from classic schematics resourcing all the parts personally. When I'll know the design and parts that make up the unit by memory, and how to build it and resource the pieces with complete ease, plus the ins and outs previously mentioned, I'll move on to other models. May take time, but It's worth it.

To build a clone costs me around the same price of a not so good sounding budget or middle priced Brand gear with the same function. Example build compressor CL 1A clone, middle priced Brand compressor. This is what I do for a living, so it's a no brainer.

Usually I am doing something music related 12 plus hours a day, most of my friends work in the Music Industry or in the Arts Industry, so I won't get distracted much.

I would have started long ago building gears, but where I live there's a shortage of everything: Shortage of electricity, shortage of running water, shortage of paper money, shortage of jobs, and shortage of parts, naturally. Instead I'm soaking in all the knowledge and sim practice I can until I can get up and working.

But that saying is really true none the less. I hope my plan works as intended. Thanks for your concern :)
 
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