ruffrecords

Re: Raspberry Pi
« Reply #20 on: October 20, 2012, 04:31:48 AM »
Thanks for the tip. The I2S interface plus the extra memory is just what the doctor ordered for audio applications. I'll be ordering one today.

Cheers

Ian
www.customtubeconsoles.com
https://mark3vtm.blogspot.co.uk/
www.eztubemixer.blogspot.co.uk


'The only people not making mistakes are the people doing nothing'


leigh

Re: Raspberry Pi
« Reply #21 on: November 10, 2014, 03:18:12 PM »
New model out today, for only $20. "Improved audio output" is among the features.

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2014/11/20-model-a-is-the-cheapest-raspberry-pi-ever/

Might be a good time to revisit some of your project ideas?

ruffrecords

Re: Raspberry Pi
« Reply #22 on: November 10, 2014, 04:14:15 PM »
Wow, I had heard about the B+ but the A+ is VERY interesting.

Cheers

Ian
www.customtubeconsoles.com
https://mark3vtm.blogspot.co.uk/
www.eztubemixer.blogspot.co.uk


'The only people not making mistakes are the people doing nothing'

leadbreath

Re: Raspberry Pi
« Reply #23 on: November 12, 2014, 11:44:43 AM »
hey ian

i believe arduino already have a audio analyser set up.
Not sure how effective it is though, you might want to have a quick look.

mick
f**k marlbro's and weed ill stick to smoking germanium and silicon

ruffrecords

Re: Raspberry Pi
« Reply #24 on: November 13, 2014, 06:17:13 AM »
hey ian

i believe arduino already have a audio analyser set up.
Not sure how effective it is though, you might want to have a quick look.

mick

Thanks for the tip Mick. At first sight it looks like the Arduino just does the display. The data crunching and FFT is done on a PC. I was hoping to do it all under one roof so to speak.

Cheers

ian
www.customtubeconsoles.com
https://mark3vtm.blogspot.co.uk/
www.eztubemixer.blogspot.co.uk


'The only people not making mistakes are the people doing nothing'

leigh

Re: Raspberry Pi
« Reply #25 on: November 13, 2014, 11:55:38 AM »

Thanks for the tip Mick. At first sight it looks like the Arduino just does the display. The data crunching and FFT is done on a PC. I was hoping to do it all under one roof so to speak.

Cheers

ian

Looks like it is definitely possible to do that kind of number crunching on board with the Pi. This project claims it's running a 2048 point FFT analysis (to drive a 5 segment LED display, derp, but the display could be improved upon with Pi's HDMI output):

https://learn.adafruit.com/raspberry-pi-spectrum-analyzer-display-on-rgb-led-strip/page-1

ruffrecords

Re: Raspberry Pi
« Reply #26 on: November 13, 2014, 04:50:25 PM »

Looks like it is definitely possible to do that kind of number crunching on board with the Pi. This project claims it's running a 2048 point FFT analysis (to drive a 5 segment LED display, derp, but the display could be improved upon with Pi's HDMI output):

https://learn.adafruit.com/raspberry-pi-spectrum-analyzer-display-on-rgb-led-strip/page-1

That's more like it and it even manages to do it in python which is an interpreted language. Should be a snap in C.

Cheers

Ian
www.customtubeconsoles.com
https://mark3vtm.blogspot.co.uk/
www.eztubemixer.blogspot.co.uk


'The only people not making mistakes are the people doing nothing'

Re: Raspberry Pi
« Reply #27 on: December 15, 2014, 02:41:50 AM »
I've been looking at the Olimex open source https://www.olimex.com/Products/ARM/ST/STM32-H107/ which seems to support I2S, and has a lot of I/O.

I'm working on an ADC system, for fun, that will plug into this board, hopefully in a month or so.  The challenge will be getting my dreadful programming skills up to speed, I've only done atMega AVR's up to now
« Last Edit: December 15, 2014, 02:45:36 AM by mgriffith »

culteousness1

Re: Raspberry Pi
« Reply #28 on: December 15, 2014, 03:46:47 AM »
I've been looking at the Olimex open source https://www.olimex.com/Products/ARM/ST/STM32-H107/ which seems to support I2S, and has a lot of I/O.

You better skip that Olimex board and get yourself a STM32F4Discovery.
It costs about € 15 at Farnell and comes with two I2S interfaces among other peripheral.

Cheers,
Carsten
"What's all this analog stuff anyhow?" - Bob Pease
"My favorite programming language is ... solder." - Bob Pease

ruffrecords

Re: Raspberry Pi
« Reply #29 on: December 16, 2014, 05:18:07 AM »
I've been looking at the Olimex open source https://www.olimex.com/Products/ARM/ST/STM32-H107/ which seems to support I2S, and has a lot of I/O.

You better skip that Olimex board and get yourself a STM32F4Discovery.
It costs about € 15 at Farnell and comes with two I2S interfaces among other peripheral.

Cheers,
Carsten

That looks very interesting. I has a built in DAC which could be used to generate the stimulus and a spare I2S input that could be connected to a high quality ADC for capturing data. The other thing I like about it is it is not overburdened with a general purpose OS. Looks like you have complete control at the lowest levels.

Cheers

Ian
www.customtubeconsoles.com
https://mark3vtm.blogspot.co.uk/
www.eztubemixer.blogspot.co.uk


'The only people not making mistakes are the people doing nothing'


culteousness1

Re: Raspberry Pi
« Reply #30 on: December 16, 2014, 09:16:33 AM »
That looks very interesting. I has a built in DAC which could be used to generate the stimulus and a spare I2S input that could be connected to a high quality ADC for capturing data. The other thing I like about it is it is not overburdened with a general purpose OS. Looks like you have complete control at the lowest levels.

There is a ready-built project on a German web page that might be of your interest, Ian:

http://mikrocontroller.bplaced.net/wordpress/?page_id=3705

Although, this project uses the bigger brother (STM32F429Discovery), the author has written a lot of
example code for the board STM32F4Discovery.

Best,
Carsten
"What's all this analog stuff anyhow?" - Bob Pease
"My favorite programming language is ... solder." - Bob Pease

ruffrecords

Re: Raspberry Pi
« Reply #31 on: December 17, 2014, 04:42:35 AM »
Even more interesting. The mini-scope project has an FFT function so it look like all the building blocks are there. Thanks for the link.

Cheers

Ian
www.customtubeconsoles.com
https://mark3vtm.blogspot.co.uk/
www.eztubemixer.blogspot.co.uk


'The only people not making mistakes are the people doing nothing'

dirtyhanfri

Re: Raspberry Pi
« Reply #32 on: December 18, 2014, 03:47:18 AM »
I was thinking yesterday, if we could use a Raspberry pi with a QantumAssylum QA4000 that could make a fancy analyzer, with lots of possibilities regarding screen size, control, wireless connectivity to stream data etc.

Maybe you could choose between a big screen with keyboard & mouse or a little 7 inch tactile screen and a phone app to control it, take screenshots and send them to a shared folder in your computer...

I don't have the knowledge to develop something like that, but i put the idea on the table for anyone who wants to get it.
Working on it...

Andy Peters

Re: Raspberry Pi
« Reply #33 on: December 21, 2014, 03:17:47 PM »
I was thinking yesterday, if we could use a Raspberry pi with a QantumAssylum QA4000 that could make a fancy analyzer,

If I recall correctly, the QA box doesn't conform to the  standard USB Audio Class. Instead it is a custom vendor class device and requires a vendor-supplied driver. Good look getting them to port their driver to the Pi.

"On the Internet, nobody can hear you mix a band"

culteousness1

Re: Raspberry Pi
« Reply #34 on: February 02, 2015, 08:33:46 AM »
I just stumbled across the new RPIv2. Didn't had a clue it was coming though...

Cheers,
Carsten
"What's all this analog stuff anyhow?" - Bob Pease
"My favorite programming language is ... solder." - Bob Pease


 

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