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What CAD software for 3D printer designs?
« on: November 25, 2020, 09:42:48 AM »
Hi,
Would like to ask you What CAD software do you recommend for 3D printer designs that is able to export STL format files?

I’m on MAC platform.

Thank you so much





Rochey

Re: What CAD software for 3D printer designs?
« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2020, 10:34:39 AM »
I have found the support and YouTube’s for fusion360 to be excellent. It outputs to STL which I then slice with Simplify3D.
Expat Audio Home: http://www.expataudio.com

Whoops

Re: What CAD software for 3D printer designs?
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2020, 11:49:57 AM »
I have found the support and YouTube’s for fusion360 to be excellent.

Thanks, never seen that one. Gonna check it out

totoxraymond

Re: What CAD software for 3D printer designs?
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2020, 03:33:07 PM »
I use FreeCAD. For simple parts, it's pretty good.

Advantages is that it's free, open source and cross plarform.

Although i don't find it easy to use. Especially whan you assemvle pieces, want to export drawings with dimensions... but it could be me. I'm terrible at 3d design.


12afael

Re: What CAD software for 3D printer designs?
« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2020, 03:37:55 PM »
I have been trying to use Fusion 360 but the learning curve is a bit slow for my brain.
I´m very happy with Rhinoceros but both are different tools for different things.
heavy metal is the law!!!

Whoops

Re: What CAD software for 3D printer designs?
« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2020, 09:24:20 PM »
I have been trying to use Fusion 360 but the learning curve is a bit slow for my brain.
I´m very happy with Rhinoceros but both are different tools for different things.

"both are different tools for different things"

I don't know any of those could you please let me know the difference of Fusion 360 and Rhinoceros?
And when do you one or the other?

Whoops

Re: What CAD software for 3D printer designs?
« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2020, 09:25:37 PM »
I use FreeCAD. For simple parts, it's pretty good.

I talked 2 friends and one used FreeCAD and the other uses SketchUp

I remember using SketchUp in the past and it was really user friendly

totoxraymond

Re: What CAD software for 3D printer designs?
« Reply #7 on: November 28, 2020, 06:28:52 AM »
I talked 2 friends and one used FreeCAD and the other uses SketchUp

I remember using SketchUp in the past and it was really user friendly

I've used sketchup for a while (not for 3d printing) but quickly abandoned. Things tend to get really messy with faces where you don't want them and nothing where there should be a face...

No good for sending to a slicer.

Again, i'm not an expert, my wife use sketchup for her job (interior architect) so i guess it must not be that bad...

Cheers,

Thomas

abbey road d enfer

Re: What CAD software for 3D printer designs?
« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2020, 06:40:38 AM »
Solidworks is the absolute #1, but very expensive (about $4k, unless you want to play the crack game).
Fusion 360 is #2, unfortunately I can't use it anymore
Freecad has a good reputation but I don't see it being far superior to Design Spark Mechanical, which I use satisfactorily.
Sketchup, although being widely used, does not offer the accuracy needed for small parts IMO
You must be aware of this difference: Solidworks and Fusion 360 are both true parametric, which is a great value if you need to produce variations or iterations of a product, DSM is not parametric, neither Freecad AFAICS.
Basically, at my humble level, it means when I flunk, I have to restart from scratch.
Who's right or wrong is irrelevant. What matters is what's right or wrong.
Star ground is for electricians.

Whoops

Re: What CAD software for 3D printer designs?
« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2020, 11:12:31 AM »
You must be aware of this difference: Solidworks and Fusion 360 are both true parametric, which is a great value if you need to produce variations or iterations of a product

What does it mean in practical terms "true parametric" in this context?

Thanks


totoxraymond

Re: What CAD software for 3D printer designs?
« Reply #10 on: November 28, 2020, 03:34:42 PM »
Solidworks is the absolute #1, but very expensive (about $4k, unless you want to play the crack game).
Fusion 360 is #2, unfortunately I can't use it anymore
Freecad has a good reputation but I don't see it being far superior to Design Spark Mechanical, which I use satisfactorily.
Sketchup, although being widely used, does not offer the accuracy needed for small parts IMO
You must be aware of this difference: Solidworks and Fusion 360 are both true parametric, which is a great value if you need to produce variations or iterations of a product, DSM is not parametric, neither Freecad AFAICS.
Basically, at my humble level, it means when I flunk, I have to restart from scratch.

I always thought freecad is parametric.

Why do you think otherwise?

To me, parametric means you draw parts using geometric constraints between objects (lines, circles, arcs, beziers curves...)

Then you can extrude, protrude, combine (logically), duplicate...

But again, i might be the worst guy to give advise...

Still following this thread with lots of interest.

12afael

Re: What CAD software for 3D printer designs?
« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2020, 10:21:22 AM »
Quote
I don't know any of those could you please let me know the difference of Fusion 360 and Rhinoceros?
And when do you one or the other?

solidwork is for mechanical design and have other tools to analyze the part. it have exporters that can produce drawings for manufacture.

Fusion:  haven´t use it much is just for the mechanical part and you can reference parts so you can easily change dimensions, .

rhino is for design,you can design a part and render it. it is for the art in between the mechanic and the art.

I say art because there tons of 3d software for art and animations.
heavy metal is the law!!!

Rochey

Re: What CAD software for 3D printer designs?
« Reply #12 on: November 30, 2020, 09:41:29 AM »
What does it mean in practical terms "true parametric" in this context?

Thanks

It means that each measurement (for instance, the sides of a cube) can be given a variable, and that you can update the variable and the rest of the design should, if physically possible, recalculate on the fly.

Imagine making a front panel with a bunch of holes for potentiometers. You find that your 3d printer sucks and makes holes a little small because it's extrudes a little too much plastic. Instead of going in and editing each hole individually, the smart engineer in you made a variable called "potholesize=7mm". You go in, edit it to potholesize=7.3mm and voila, all the holes resize beautifully.

/R
Expat Audio Home: http://www.expataudio.com


 

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