jacomart

LTSpice (MacOS version)
« on: March 29, 2021, 03:17:29 AM »
Hi all, yesterday I used LTSpice for the first time in the MacOS version, I was struck by the difference compared to the one for Windows which is much more interactive and easy to use.  I'm baffled.  I also had continuous crashes in an attempt to update the library: it works for 10 minutes by downloading files and then quits unexpectedly.  Can someone give me suggestions other than switching to Windows?  (I'm using an iMac 2019 with 32GB of RAM, BigSur etc...)
Well, I wrote this message more to share my despair than to have a solution, which I think is unlikely, but if it exists you are welcome!

Cheers
J


12afael

Re: LTSpice (MacOS version)
« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2021, 04:47:15 AM »
I have the same problem mac version is useless... this morning I had to do a simulation at home at my pc. I´m toying with the idea of have a rapsberry pi just to have ltspice at hand.
heavy metal is the law!!!

jacomart

Re: LTSpice (MacOS version)
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2021, 05:52:29 AM »
I am considering the idea to install Vmware fusion, which is free for personal use, which can runs some version of Windows, even if I’m annoyed about that the owner of the source code cannot compile the same features on the various OSes.

abbey road d enfer

Re: LTSpice (MacOS version)
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2021, 10:26:43 AM »
I believe the LTspice group is able to provide more answers than here.
Who's right or wrong is irrelevant. What matters is what's right or wrong.
Star ground is for electricians.

jacomart

Re: LTSpice (MacOS version)
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2021, 02:25:48 PM »
I believe the LTspice group is able to provide more answers than here.

You're right, that's why I just joined the LTspice group on groups.io.
In the meantime, however, I am successfully testing a solution with a commercial version of Wine which seems to work well and which of course does not require the installation and ownership of a Windows license.

Cheers
J

abbey road d enfer

Re: LTSpice (MacOS version)
« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2021, 05:18:55 AM »
What is the issue with having a Windows PC?
Most technical softwares work best on PC.
Who's right or wrong is irrelevant. What matters is what's right or wrong.
Star ground is for electricians.

jacomart

Re: LTSpice (MacOS version)
« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2021, 10:03:13 PM »
What is the issue with having a Windows PC?
Most technical softwares work best on PC.

Actually no particular problem. I am retired and in my home "office" I have a Mac that I mainly use for "music" rather than electronics, but my old Windows 10 laptop is in the basement and I am sometimes too lazy to go down the stairs.
My question was more philosophical than practical, namely: if your software has versions for different operating systems, why are the features and user interfaces so different and one version is so disadvantaged over the other? Maybe mine is some kind of engineer fussiness (either do things right or avoid doing them). But considering that in my work I have almost always used NI Multisim the question is probably related to the fact that I am becoming a grumpy old man!

Cheers
J

abbey road d enfer

Re: LTSpice (MacOS version)
« Reply #7 on: April 04, 2021, 03:03:25 AM »
My question was more philosophical than practical, namely: if your software has versions for different operating systems, why are the features and user interfaces so different and one version is so disadvantaged over the other?
That's a good question. I don't know of any software that was designed from the start as multi-platform. They always start on a particular platform and are later ported, when the programmer figures out some of the aspects are not actually that portable, and that the new platform may allow doing things differently. Now I understand that programmers are fed up having to adapt almost every year to the whims of Apple. Microsoft has shown good consistency since W7.
Who's right or wrong is irrelevant. What matters is what's right or wrong.
Star ground is for electricians.

squarewave

Re: LTSpice (MacOS version)
« Reply #8 on: April 04, 2021, 08:28:52 AM »
My question was more philosophical than practical, namely: if your software has versions for different operating systems, why are the features and user interfaces so different and one version is so disadvantaged over the other?
Because GUI libraries are usually tied to the OS. It's a lot easier to just use the widgets and drop-downs and buttons and builtin OS primitives for making GUIs than it is to make your own. Cross platform GUI libraries like QT and the ones browsers use didn't come along until long after LTSpice was crafted.

jacomart

Re: LTSpice (MacOS version)
« Reply #9 on: April 04, 2021, 09:29:14 AM »
Because GUI libraries are usually tied to the OS. It's a lot easier to just use the widgets and drop-downs and buttons and builtin OS primitives for making GUIs than it is to make your own. Cross platform GUI libraries like QT and the ones browsers use didn't come along until long after LTSpice was crafted.
I agree with this, but I still remain of the idea that, rather than providing a sloppy product, it would have been preferable that the only distributed version was for the Windows operating system
(however, companies like Adobe or Avid, and more, have been producing software for both Windows and Macos with decent user interfaces for many years.)

Cheers
J
« Last Edit: April 04, 2021, 09:43:01 AM by jacomart »


abbey road d enfer

Re: LTSpice (MacOS version)
« Reply #10 on: April 04, 2021, 11:07:23 AM »
companies like Adobe or Avid, and more, have been producing software for both Windows and Macos with decent user interfaces for many years.)
For Adobe, it's vital, but Avid, I don't know. ProTools started on mac and came later to Windows, but there was a time where users didn't like it at all. It may have changed now...
Who's right or wrong is irrelevant. What matters is what's right or wrong.
Star ground is for electricians.

jacomart

Re: LTSpice (MacOS version)
« Reply #11 on: April 09, 2021, 08:00:16 AM »
Because GUI libraries are usually tied to the OS. It's a lot easier to just use the widgets and drop-downs and buttons and builtin OS primitives for making GUIs than it is to make your own. Cross platform GUI libraries like QT and the ones browsers use didn't come along until long after LTSpice was crafted.

As far as I know the Qt / Mac libraries for MacOSX were released around 2001, LTSpice IV for MacOS dates back to 2013 while LTSpice XVII was released in 2016. I really think there was plenty of time to improve the user interface. Anyway, I repeat myself: if you don't want to make a good version for Mac, don't do it at all!
I am not writing here to make controversy with the members of this group nor to do so with the software developers but rather to express my disappointment with such a sloppy piece of software. Now that I have, I can put my shrewish side to sleep (Sorry for the late reply).

Cheers
JM

squarewave

Re: LTSpice (MacOS version)
« Reply #12 on: April 09, 2021, 11:04:25 AM »
As far as I know the Qt / Mac libraries for MacOSX were released around 2001, LTSpice IV for MacOS dates back to 2013 while LTSpice XVII was released in 2016. I really think there was plenty of time to improve the user interface. Anyway, I repeat myself: if you don't want to make a good version for Mac, don't do it at all!
I am not writing here to make controversy with the members of this group nor to do so with the software developers but rather to express my disappointment with such a sloppy piece of software. Now that I have, I can put my shrewish side to sleep (Sorry for the late reply).

Cheers
JM
I don't think anyone is arguing with you. Do something right or don't do it at all. I was just explaining that most software is tied to the OS because of native UIs. Cross platform GUI libs have only recently become practical to use. AD would have to completely rewrite the LTSpice UI to use whatever cross platform GUI lib. And LTSpice is a little more demanding graphically compared to some business intelligence app. It's hard to justify that expense if the software is free. Most engineering software runs on Windows so most engineers need a Windows machine anyway.

jacomart

Re: LTSpice (MacOS version)
« Reply #13 on: April 09, 2021, 12:19:13 PM »
I don't think anyone is arguing with you. Do something right or don't do it at all. I was just explaining that most software is tied to the OS because of native UIs. Cross platform GUI libs have only recently become practical to use. AD would have to completely rewrite the LTSpice UI to use whatever cross platform GUI lib. And LTSpice is a little more demanding graphically compared to some business intelligence app. It's hard to justify that expense if the software is free. Most engineering software runs on Windows so most engineers need a Windows machine anyway.

I don't think anyone is arguing with me, I just wanted to be clear that I am not fighting with anyone! :)

Cheers
JM

abbey road d enfer

Re: LTSpice (MacOS version)
« Reply #14 on: April 10, 2021, 01:56:34 AM »
Are we going to have a fight about not fighting?  ;D
Who's right or wrong is irrelevant. What matters is what's right or wrong.
Star ground is for electricians.


 

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