Best way to punch IEC panel mount connector in boxes.

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wlinart

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abbey road d enfer said:
The big problem with Powercon mains cords is that they are not commonly found.
In comparison IEC cords can be found almost anywhere.
If you've been on tour with a missing Powercon cable, you know what I mean...

I could imagine. I use it for my studio gear, where it will never go missing :)
 

ruffrecords

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abbey road d enfer said:
I haven't received the machine yet (well, ,only half of it, the second parcel has been mislaid by the driver and shipped back to sender  :mad: ), so I tried to make myself prepared, I have all the .dxf files done, but I have troubles converting into g-code.
I've tried with two different softwares, none is capable of producing the g-code file. One (Lazycam) is missing a .pst file and the other (Estlcam) is like hieroglyphs to me, although supposed to be one of the simplest...
How did you proceed?

My main plan was to use it to make prototype front panels so no engraving was required. I had blanks the right size so it was just a matter of creating holes,  slots and other shapes.

Creating the required G-code to do this from a 2D dxf file is non-trivial. You need to know the material thickness and take into account the  drill size when calculating the drill path and feed rate. The CNC machine I purchased came with a program called Mach 3 which was supposed to do this. But it was a Windows program and I run Linux. I tried Mach3 under Wine but it did not work. So in the end I decided to write some Python scrips to create G-code. I designed basic functions to create G-code sequences for circles and slots with input parameters of hole/slot dimensions, drill size and feed rate. I got these working and proceeded to tests them out first on plastic and then on aluminium. This where I ran into problems. Everything worked fine with plastic or wood but I had huge difficulties with aluminium. No matter how slow the feed rate, how small the Z-increment, with or without lubricant, I could never finish a panel without breaking at least one drill bit. I toyed with the idea of upgrading the spindle motor but I had spent so much time on  I decided to abandon it and go back to having panels made for me.

Cheers

Ian
 

abbey road d enfer

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ruffrecords said:
My main plan was to use it to make prototype front panels so no engraving was required. I had blanks the right size so it was just a matter of creating holes,  slots and other shapes.

Creating the required G-code to do this from a 2D dxf file is non-trivial. You need to know the material thickness and take into account the  drill size when calculating the drill path and feed rate. The CNC machine I purchased came with a program called Mach 3 which was supposed to do this. But it was a Windows program and I run Linux. I tried Mach3 under Wine but it did not work. So in the end I decided to write some Python scrips to create G-code. I designed basic functions to create G-code sequences for circles and slots with input parameters of hole/slot dimensions, drill size and feed rate. I got these working and proceeded to tests them out first on plastic and then on aluminium. This where I ran into problems. Everything worked fine with plastic or wood but I had huge difficulties with aluminium. No matter how slow the feed rate, how small the Z-increment, with or without lubricant, I could never finish a panel without breaking at least one drill bit. I toyed with the idea of upgrading the spindle motor but I had spent so much time on  I decided to abandon it and go back to having panels made for me.

Cheers

Ian
Thanks for the explanation. the machine I ordered comes with Mach3 also. I hope I won't have so much problems as you had since the router is very powerful and it has a lubrication system. Stil, I don't expect it to be a triumphant march!
 

ruffrecords

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abbey road d enfer said:
Thanks for the explanation. the machine I ordered comes with Mach3 also. I hope I won't have so much problems as you had since the router is very powerful and it has a lubrication system. Stil, I don't expect it to be a triumphant march!

If I were to repeat the process the two things I would change would be a more powerful router and a lubrication system ao hopefully you will have fewer problems. Fingers crossed. Which CNC did you buy?

Cheers

Ian
 

ruffrecords

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abbey road d enfer said:
https://www.amazon.fr/gp/product/B081MVX3Q1/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Thanks for that. I see it is a 4 axis type. Mine was just 3 and had a smaller bed. The controller looks almost identical to mine except the Centronics input connector has been replace by USB, you have an extra axis out and a couple of spares as well. I am not sure how a  controller that size is going to speed control a 2.2KW motor.

Cheers

ian
 

abbey road d enfer

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ruffrecords said:
Thanks for that. I see it is a 4 axis type.
Yes. The difference with the 3-axis version was so small I didn't hesitate.

I am not sure how a  controller that size is going to speed control a 2.2KW motor.
Actually it's quite heavy and chunky, I don't expect it to be an issue.
I'm much more concerned about my abilities and the software aspects. It starts with a software disk that I can't open, though I tried with 3 different computers. I contacted the vendor, urging him to send me a correct disk.
I've seen CNC controllers that actually may offer a different approach, such as
https://www.amazon.fr/dp/B081NPNR6W/ref=sspa_dk_detail_4?psc=1&pd_rd_i=B081NPNR6W&pd_rd_w=hXdAb&pf_rd_p=42b0c882-2f60-488f-b868-d46b19aecf92&pd_rd_wg=uIHVU&pf_rd_r=AR0EJCAJYEDMGDRVGD1H&pd_rd_r=b6128cd5-82ed-49b3-a820-91cbd7228d43&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEzNFNJMlJYUzZBUUozJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwMTUxNjU1MlgzWTVINElUWEhVSyZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwMjAwMjg0MUxNTlhHR0VQUFdCVSZ3aWRnZXROYW1lPXNwX2RldGFpbCZhY3Rpb249Y2xpY2tSZWRpcmVjdCZkb05vdExvZ0NsaWNrPXRydWU=
I tried to find a user manual but no luck...
 

ruffrecords

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I cannot remember what docs came with it - it was a while ago. I will go look in the garage tomorrow where the CNC is stored and see if I can find anything.

Cheers

ian
 

outoftune

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it seems all the punch options mentioned in these various threads about IEC holes are no longer available.

anyone have a recommendation to on that is currently available?
 

Walrus

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This will work for a number of the RS IEC connectors, but it's not cheap!
https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/punch-die-kits/4778909/
 

Walrus

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Maybe if you are making loads of kit. But for the 3 or 4 builds per year, the nut and spanner are fine!
 

outoftune

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Walrus said:
Maybe if you are making loads of kit. But for the 3 or 4 builds per year, the nut and spanner are fine!
you’re using the green lee punched you linked by hand with a wrench? you don’t need a hydraulic?

i have one of their punches for 1” hole for xlrs that works great, seems like this could be worth it.
 

abbey road d enfer

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Walrus said:
Maybe if you are making loads of kit. But for the 3 or 4 builds per year, the nut and spanner are fine!
Last time I used Greenlee punches was in 1970. I used them for tube sockets. The largest one, for octal, failed on me when the thread was stripped. That was in 1mm mild steel.
 

Rob Flinn

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abbey road d enfer said:
Last time I used Greenlee punches was in 1970. I used them for tube sockets. The largest one, for octal, failed on me when the thread was stripped. That was in 1mm mild steel.

I always find plenty of oil on the thread & the cuttting edges, makes these punches cut much more easily.  It also prolongs their life too.
 

abbey road d enfer

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Rob Flinn said:
I always find plenty of oil on the thread & the cuttting edges, makes these punches cut much more easily.  It also prolongs their life too.
Indeed; that was in the recommandations. It did not prevent what I consider premature failure.
 

gyraf

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..also, pressure bearings are nice for reducing thread wear. I've been using the hand tool version for quite a few years, haven't had any thread wear (but loads of cutting edge wear)..

That IEC cutting tool sure has become expensive lately !!!
 

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